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The Catalyst

Nurses, nursing educators praised during celebration

By Cindy Abole
Public Relations

Educators and professionals involved in nursing professional development were praised at MUSC’s first celebration of National Nurses in Staff Development Week, July 2-9.

Joining City of Charleston Mayor Joe Riley Jr. at the July 2 Nursing Professional Development Specialist Week proclamation signing were MUSC nurses Stephanie Chomos, from left, Melissa Dunkerley, Cameron Mitchum, Lisa Langdale, Patti Deltry and Weatherly Brice. Not pictured is Karin Elkins and Heather Dodson.
Joining City of Charleston Mayor Joe Riley Jr. at the July 2 Nursing Professional Development Specialist Week proclamation signing were MUSC nurses Stephanie Chomos, from left, Melissa Dunkerley, Cameron Mitchum, Lisa Langdale, Patti Deltry and Weatherly Brice. Not pictured is Karin Elkins and Heather Dodson.

Efforts were led by Lisa Langdale, R.N.-BC, a clinical nurse educator and manager for Medical University Hospital Authority’s Center for Education and Best Practice, and Weatherly Brice, R.N.-BC, Clinical Education Department coordinator. They assembled a planning committee of nurse leaders and educators to lay down plans for activities supporting clinical nurse educators and the hospital’s more than 1,900 nursing professionals.

Nurse educators are registered nurses who share their clinical experience and love for teaching others in staff education and maintaining their professional competencies after licensure.

According to Langdale, these specialists serve as consultants, research specialists, facilitators, leaders and mentors who work with various generations of nurses to learn their needs, perspectives and strengths. They integrate those skill sets with the hospital’s policies and best practices.

The celebration started with a Professional Development Specialist Week proclamation signed by City of Charleston Mayor Joe Riley Jr. on July 2 at City Hall. Nursing specialists also gathered July 3 for an educator network lunch and membership drive supporting the South Carolina Coastal Affiliate of the Association for Nursing Professional Development. On July 9, nursing educator Brian Connor, Ph.D., R.N., discussed learning with technology practices in his presentation, “Flipping the Classroom.”

“Our profession needs to be ready to train and prepare the next generation of nurses,” said Langdale. “We’re committed to providing effective lifelong learning strategies, teaching tools and processes that enhances the professional nursing practice.”

In addition to supporting clinical nurses, nurse educators play a significant role in preparing and recruiting new nurses. According to a nursing management aging workforce survey conducted by the Bernard Hodes Group, about a third of the nation’s nurses are 50 years and older. About 55 percent of these nurses plan to retire in the next decade.

According to a 2010 Institute of Medicine Report on the Future of Nursing, specialists have recommended to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses in the workforce to 80 percent while increasing the number of nurses with doctorates. 

Nurses are challenged by demands from meeting the diverse needs of their patient population to new technology, a changing health care system, and new processes and methods that impact nursing practice, according to Langdale.

“The job descriptions and roles of nurses are changing quickly. Although clinical nurses are focused on patient care, there are other specific jobs and duties that they see in their nursing practice,” Langdale said. 

Tri-county nurse educators partner with the S.C. Coastal Affiliate of the Association of Nursing Professional Development, which serves nurses working at MUSC, Roper Hospital, Trident Medical Center, East Cooper Medical Center and other affiliates.

It has been a year and a half since MUSC launched its five-year Magnet nursing journey to improve excellence and establish quality outcomes that improve patient care. Nurses have a chance to get involved by developing or revising policies and standards, collaborating with other professionals, focusing on education and discovering ways to improve the nursing environment, Langdale said.

July 24, 2013
 
 
 

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