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MUSC Bulletin | College of Health Professions

PhD Health and Rehabilitation Science | Course Descriptions

HRS-720. Independent Study in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of health services as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-725. Independent Study in Functional Limitations. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of functional limitations as it relates to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-730. Independent Study in Pathology and Impairment. This course provides the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study/experience in a focused area of pathology and impairment as they related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-735. Special Topics in Health Services. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in health services related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-740. Special Topics in Functional Limitations. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in functional limitations related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-745. Special Topics in Pathology and Impairment. This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore a specialized area of interest in pathology and impairment related to health and rehabilitation sciences. 1-4 s.h.

HRS-800. Introduction to Translational Research. Students will critically evaluate the relevant literature to broaden their perspective on translational research and funding opportunities.  Invited guest speakers, MUSC faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students will present recently published papers and develop research proposals related to translational research.  3 s.h.

HRS-805. Introduction to Health & Rehabilitation Services. Students will study the roles, goals, and objectives of the various health services and rehabilitation disciplines with specific emphasis on issues related to healthcare organization, financing and delivery of services, patient access and associated barriers to services, reimbursement for health and rehabilitation services, and emerging technologies relevant to health and rehabilitation services. 3 s.h.

HRS-810. Introduction to Health & Rehabilitation Theories. Students will explore historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of health and rehabilitation science with special emphasis on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Enabling America (1997). Students will analyze the stages, components, and domains of the enabling-disabling process and review rehabilitation research and relevant funding mechanisms in the United States. 3 s.h.

HRS-811. Fundamentals of Grant Writing. The main objective of this seminar course is to train students to develop a research idea in their area of interest and transform it into a complete NIH R21 grant application. The R21 application is unique in that it affords the opportunity to conduct a high risk study as long as it has a corresponding high reward potential. The course will be administered by the primary instructor but will take advantage of the unique knowledge base and skill sets of a few invited guest speakers (MUSC faculty and/or postdoctoral fellows). 2 s.h.

HRS-812. Seminar on Health Services Research. A health services research covering the evolution of HSR over the last 40 years. Students will review the original studies that effected the major 'paradigm shifts' that HSR has undergone since the 1970s. Students will discuss classical health services models and design approaches and critically analyze contemporary HSR studies, in view of the models, designs, and methods used in the classical studies. 1 s.h.

HRS-814. Basic Academic Teaching Skills. This course provides an overview of the principles of adult learning; instructional design, instructional methods, skills, media, and evaluation; and instructional technology for use in health and rehabilitation sciences.  Emphasis will be on the design, delivery, and evaluation of selected units of instruction.  Under guided conditions, graduate students will hone teaching skills for use in a wide variety of contexts. 2 s.h.

HRS-815. Health and Rehabilitation Lab Rotation. Through rotations through applied laboratories, students will be exposed to diverse research arenas, scientific approaches, technologies and experiences. 1-6 s.h. (variable)

HRS-817. Doctoral Seminar II - Diversity & Culture. Students will critically evaluate the relevant literature to broaden their perspective on diversity and cultural issues relevant to research and funding opportunities. Invited guest speakers, MUSC faculty, postdoctoral fellows and students will present recently published papers and developing research proposals related to diversity and culture. 1 s.h.

HRS-818. Doctoral Seminar III - Ethics. Students will critically evaluate the relevant literature to broaden their perspective on research ethics. Invited guest speakers, MUSC faculty; postdoctoral fellows and students will explore ethical conduct in conducting research with special emphasis on working with human subjects. 1 s.h.

HRS-819. Teaching Practicum in Health & Rehabilitation Science. Under faculty supervision, students will engage in teaching-learning contexts that allow for the application of instructional design, delivery, and evaluation principles, and further hone their teaching skills to meet the needs of a variety of learners: students, peers, patients, and community members. Prerequisite: HRS-814  1-4 s.h. (variable)

HRS-820. Statistical Methods for Rehabilitation Science. This course provides a working knowledge of approaches to the analysis of archival data in rehabilitation research. The course is intended for PhD students in the College of Health Professions, but would also be of interest to graduate students in other professional programs. Topics include 1) data set and variable description; 2) issues of ascertainment bias associated with retrospective data; 3) criteria for the selection of descriptive statistics; 4) visual presentation of parameters; 4) formulation of hypotheses appropriate for the data; 5) multivariable analysis for continuous dependent variables; 6) log transformation; 7) logistic regression; 8) Kaplan Meier curves; 9) controls for selection bias; 10) use of factor and cluster analysis for data reduction; 11) interpretation of outputs from SAS and SPSS statistical software; 12) presentation and discussion of results. Students will use SAS or SPSS software to perform analyses of observational data to answer rehabilitation questions and interpret results in terms of both clinical and statistical conclusions. Minimum pre-requisites include basic statistics preparation and a minimum of 6 hours completed in the doctoral curriculum, or permission of the instructor. 3 s.h.

HRS-823. Doctoral Seminar I - Critical Review of Statistical Methods.  Students will critically examine statistical methods commonly used in Health and Rehabilitation studies and published papers.  Students will review and present recently published papers in health and rehabilitation sciences and related areas. 1 s.h.

HRS-825. Human Anatomy for Doctoral Students. Human Anatomy provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of all regions of the human today. Doctoral students will have opportunity for special emphasis on regions and systems that relate to their research interests through papers or projects as agreed upon between student, content advisor and Dr. Thomas. 6 s.h. 

HRS-828. Doctoral Seminar IV - Intro to Scientific Writing and Publishing. This course is an introduction to scientific writing and publishing. Students will be introduced to the critical aspects of the scientific writing process and mechanisms of publishing and dissemination of information to their respective clinical and research disiplines as well as the wider community of scientists. 1 s.h.

HRS-830. Quantitative Methods for Research.  This course is designed to instruct students in acquisition of skills to use data sets and conduct quantitative analysis to address research questions. The course will also result in acquisition of knowledge of statistical principles and methods most commonly used in health services research.  Prerequisites: DHA 867, DHA 866, and HRS 820 3 s.h. 

HRS-830L. Intro to SAS Programming Lab.  This course is an introduction to SAS programming for incoming students.  The primary software program used in SAS Version 9.2.  Students will learn the basics of data set creation by data transformation to/from SAS to Excel, SPSS, ect., using Import and Export functions or database Copy software.  Concatenation, merging and sub-setting data, as well as data restructuring and new variable construction using SAS functions will be taught.  Simple procedures to clean and quality control data, as well as procedures for calculating descriptive statistics, plots, and print outs will be covered. 1 s.h.

HRS-990. Doctoral Dissertation.  Dissertation work includes original investigation that gives evidence of mature scholarship and critical judgment, indicates knowledge of research methods and techniques, and demonstrates the ability to carry out independent investigation. Preparation of the dissertation may comply with the regulations contained in A Guide to the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations, which is available in the Graduate Office or through the College of Graduate Studies website. 1-12 s.h.

  
Last Published with Edits:July 7, 2014 11:14 AM
Last Comprehensive Review:July 2014
 
 
 
 

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