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MUSC Bulletin | College of Health Professions

Occupational Therapy | Course Descriptions

OT-510. Professional Issues in Occupational Therapy. This course increases awareness of professional issues within the field of occupational therapy. Topics such as professional accountability, professional liability, and continuing competence are examined. Students develop skills to enhance lifelong learning, and advocate for their own professional development, the development of the profession, and for those who are unable to meet their own occupational needs in society. 3 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-4

OT-520. OT Clinical Correlate (Psychosocial Practice). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process. The format includes discussion and participation in clinical fieldwork experience. Students observe and participate in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention of individuals with psychiatric disorders, developmental delay, and mental retardation, and apply concepts from various psychosocial frames of reference. 1 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L

OT-522. OT Clinical Correlate (Pediatrics). This course provides guided observation and selected participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during a full-time, one-week Level I fieldwork experience with emphasis in pediatrics. Students observe and participate in evaluation and treatment of pediatric clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical or educational settings and apply concepts from previous and concurrent courses emphasizing pediatric diagnoses, intervention and occupational performance. 1 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L, OT 659

OT-530. Occupational Performance for Neurological Conditions I. This course promotes entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with movement dysfunction resulting from acquired neurological disorders. Specific emphasis is placed upon the relationship between occupational performance dysfunction and motor performance skill deficits. Students integrate motor control and motor learning conceptual practice models with occupational performance frameworks as a basis for evaluation and treatment planning. Through in-depth and extensive exploration of motor control mechanisms and theories of activity-dependent plasticity, students develop an understanding of the role of an occupational therapist in motor rehabilitation. 3 S.H. lecture. Faculty Required. Pre-requisites: OT 701, OT 646, OT 646L

OT-530L. Occupational Performance for Neurological Conditions I Lab. This course provides active involvement with clients with acute and chronic disabling conditions of neurological origin. Students will practice neurorehabilitation evaluations and apply these skills to the evaluation of clients with neurological movement impairment. Students learn other neurorehabilitation skills such as wheelchair mobility, transfers, and facilitation of movement skills for occupational performance. Students perform a synthesis of motor rehabilitation literature and apply research-based evidence to the clinical reasoning process, specifically with regards to choosing and formulating intervention for these clients. Through hands-on involvement with clients and dynamic interactive discussions/debates, students experience first-hand the application of conceptual motor rehabilitation frameworks to the occupational therapy process. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 701, OT 646, OT 646L

OT-533. Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice. This course introduces students in the rehabilitation sciences to the concepts of evidence-based practice. Beginning with an orientation to published literature in the health professions, attention will be given to techniques of searching bibliographic databases such as Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsychINFO. Students will search, read, and analyze literature that validates current practice. 1 S.H. lecture. Required Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

OT-545. Surface Anatomy. This course focuses on the location and palpation of the anatomical structures of the upper and lower extremities, head, neck, back, thorax and abdomen. 1 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

OT-555. Quantitative Research for Evidence-Based Practice. This course introduces students in the rehabilitation sciences to the concepts of quantitative research as it relates to evidence-based practice by giving attention to basic principles underlying the process of clinical science, including concepts of the scientific methods related to experimental research. Three major aspects of the scientific method addressed will be: 1) reliability and validity, 2) research design and 3) data analysis. 1 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 533

OT-560. Qualitative Research for Evidence-Based Practice. This course introduces and provides preliminary experience with qualitative research approaches used to generate new knowledge in the rehabilitation sciences. Attention will be given to exploring the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative research methods, the principles of methodologic rigor, strategies for qualitative analysis, the importance of ethical research conduct, and to examining and critiquing existing professional evidence that may be used to inform practice. 1 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 533

OT-561. Research/Scholarship Experience in Occupational Therapy I. It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of a faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. Pre-requisites: OT 533, OT 555, OT 560

OT-562. Research/Scholarship Experience in Occupational Therapy II. This course is a continuation of the Research/Scholarship Experience in Occupational Therapy I. It provides an opportunity for students to work in small groups under the direction of a faculty member and engage in research or scholarship activities related to occupational therapy. Pre-requisites: OT 533

OT-601. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. This course examines the major sensorimotor, cognitive, neuromotor, and psychosocial theories of normal development from childhood to early adulthood from an occupational therapy perspective. The etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders are discussed with emphasis on neurological and biomechanical conditions. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate the development of infants and children in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor / feeding, and neuromotor. Clinical decision making and treatment in a variety of therapeutic settings will be discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716, OT 545

OT-601L. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I lecture. Emphasis is placed on participating in completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with neuromuscular conditions. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716, OT 545

OT-602. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics II. This course is a continuation of material from Occupational Performance in Pediatrics I. Emphasis is placed on the etiology and clinical features of common infant and childhood diseases / disorders with emphasis on cognitive and sensory processing disorders. Students are introduced to common occupational therapy assessments and treatment approaches used to evaluate infants and children with cognitive delays and sensory processing deficits in the following areas: visual perceptual, fine motor, self-help, oral motor, and sensory processing. Clinical decision making, treatment, and documentation in a variety of therapeutic settings are discussed. 3 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L

OT-602L. Occupational Performance in Pediatrics II Lab. Small group sessions are used to apply principles and ideas presented in Occupational Performance in Pediatrics II lecture. Emphasis is placed on completing occupational therapy pediatric assessments, developing treatment activities, goal setting, and documentation for the infants and children with cognitive or sensory processing disorders. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 601, OT 601L

OT-603. Occupational Performance for Geriatrics. This course examines foundational, clinical, and behavioral sciences pertinent to the application of the occupational therapy processes of evaluation, intervention and outcomes for older adults. Students gain knowledge of the multiple issues surrounding occupational therapy practice with older adults including age-related changes, common diagnoses and conditions, ethical and legal issues impacting service delivery, and the influence of contextual factors on occupational performance. 2 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

OT-604. Occupational Performance for Psychosocial Practice I. This course provides an introduction to psychosocial occupational therapy. Concepts of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics, theory, and skills are examined and applied to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. Psychosocial frames of reference and evaluation methods are introduced. 1 S.H. lecture.

OT-604L. Occupational Performance for Psychosocial Practice I Lab. This course provides participation in lab activities designed to facilitate an understanding of therapeutic use of self, interviewing techniques, communication skills, and group process dynamics / skills with emphasis on the clinical relevance to psychosocial occupational therapy treatment. 1 S.H. lab.

OT-606. Occupational Performance for Neurological Conditions II.  This course is the second of two courses designed to promote entry-level occupational therapy skills in the evaluation and treatment of clients with neurological conditions. Theories and principles or evaluation, treatment, and adaptation will be presented with specific emphasis on the relationship between occupational performance and cognitive frameworks as they relate to occupational therapy practice. 3 S.H. Required prerequisites: OT 530, OT 530L

OT 606L. Occupational Performance for Neurological Conditions II Lab. This course promotes knowledge and acquisition of skills and attitudes necessary for the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process of evaluation, intervention, and outcome as it relates to neurological conditions, specifically for clients who have survived a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and present with cognitive and/or perceptual dysfunction. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 530, OT 530L

OT-612. Introduction to Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. This course provides an introduction to occupational science, the study of humans as occupational beings. Further, the role of occupation as the philosophical underpinning of the profession of occupational therapy is explored, along with its history, development, and key organizations. Current status of and challenges for the profession are discussed across a variety of contexts - medical, educational and community. Students begin to engage in the process of envisioning and developing their career trajectory. 2 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

OT-613. Theoretical Foundations of Occupational Therapy. This course provides an overview of the theoretical foundations upon which the practice of contemporary occupational therapy is built. Principles of theory and development are explored, overarching concepts are examined, and application to practice and research is considered. Attention is given to core theories related to occupational behavior and the profession of occupational therapy. 1 S.H. lecture.Required.  Prerequisites: Completion of first semester courses. 

OT-619. Pathophysiology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint rehabilitation science students with pathological changes in human function that lead to and are associated with various diseases. Understanding diseases and pathologically altered function forms an important component to evaluation, treatment, and the rehabilitation process. 3 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716

OT-625. OT Clinical Correlate (Physical Dysfunction). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process. The format includes discussion and participation in a full-time, one-week Level I clinical fieldwork experience with emphasis in physical dysfunction. Students observe and participate in the evaluation and intervention of clients with a variety of diagnoses and conditions that are served in medical and/or community-based settings while applying concepts from the biomechanical, neurodevelopmental, and rehabilitative frames of reference. 1 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 606, OT 606L

OT-627. Clinical Anatomy of the Upper Limb. The course will provide opportunities for the student to study and learn the anatomy of the upper limb, using videotaped presentations, computer applications, group meetings, and clinical applications. Each student enrolled is assumed to be an independent learner who is motivated strictly by his/her own interest in anatomy. Consequently, in order for the offering to be successful, all students will have to complete all assignments in an attentive fashion, as well as be present for group meetings. It is expected that everyone will participate to the fullest and give a significant contribution to his/her group activities. 1 S.H. lecture. Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

OT-636. Advanced Treatment Techniques. Presents an opportunity for students to study new and/or specialized treatment techniques in a particular area of practice. Practical experiences in using the selected treatment techniques are included. 1-3 S.H.

OT-637. Special Topics in Occupational Therapy. This course allows students to expand knowledge and skills in an area of special interest. 1-3 S.H.

OT 638. Occupational Performance for Psychosocial Practice II. This course explores methods of evaluation, program planning, and treatment implementation for psychosocial occupational therapy. A discussion of psychosocial issues of clients and caregivers as a vital aspect of health care is included. 2 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 604, OT 604L

OT-639. Delivery and Management of Occupational Therapy. The evolution of an increasingly complex health care environment makes it essential for occupational therapy students to understand contemporary service delivery and management practices. This course provides an overview of healthcare systems, educational systems, and community systems in which occupational therapists practice. This course introduces students to current concepts and principles of management including reimbursement issues, laws pertinent to employment, and human resource issues. Principles of program development are explored and applied. 3 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: All previous course work from Semesters 1-3

OT-640. Clinical Practicum I. This course is the first of two Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process. Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: Completion of all didactic coursework and Level 1 fieldwork

OT-641. Clinical Practicum II. This course is the second in a series of two Level II, full-time fieldwork experiences intended to emphasize the application of an academically acquired body of knowledge by providing the student with an in-depth experience in performance of the occupational therapy process. Under supervision, the student will evaluate and treat clients across the life span reflecting diversity of diagnosis and culture. 12 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 640

OT-644. Occupational Performance for Musculoskeletal Conditions I. This course provides students with a solid foundation in the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders using the biomechanical and rehabilitative frames of reference. Included in this first segment are: 1) principles of evaluation, including interviewing skills, muscle testing, goniometry, dexterity and endurance 2) concepts and techniques related to physical intervention 3) application of activity analysis to functional daily living tasks 4) basic skills for transfers and adaptive equipment. The science of biomechanics and kinesiology is presented in relation to acute and chronic orthopedic disorders along with case presentations to integrate clinical decision-making and problem solving. 4 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716, OT 545

OT-644L. Occupational Performance for Musculoskeletal Conditions I Lab. This course provides the student with a solid foundation in the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders to ensure the development of practical occupational therapy evaluation skills. Students study and practice assessment tests and measurement skills including occupational profile, initial interviewing skills, manual muscle testing, measurement of joint range of motion, vital sign assessments, dexterity, sensation testing, and neurological screening. Concepts and techniques related to therapeutic intervention and posture analysis are practiced and related to various common situations involving musculoskeletal dysfunction to provide problem-solving skills during laboratory sessions. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716, OT 545

OT-646. Occupational Performance for Musculoskeletal Conditions II. This course provides students with a solid foundation in evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this course are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment of orthopedic disorders and the progression into more complicated conditions and advanced treatment techniques. Principles of occupational task adaptation, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, treatment modalities, and orthotic fabrication are presented. Student case presentations are used to build upon the skills acquired in the previous musculoskeletal course. Clinical problems are used to ensure the student is able to develop a treatment plan and home program for any given case. 4 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

OT-646L. Occupational Performance for Musculoskeletal Conditions II Lab. This course provides students with evaluation and treatment skills for musculoskeletal disorders. Included in this second segment are the continued exploration of evaluation and treatment methodology for orthopedic disorders, principles and application of modality use, occupational tasks, upper extremity evaluation and treatment, industrial rehabilitation, and adaptation, orthotic fabrication of static and dynamic splints and case study presentations to integrate advance occupational therapy evaluation and treatment skills. All activities are demonstrated and practiced to build on the practical skills during the first segment of the course. 2 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L

OT-659. OT Clinical Correlate (Occupation). This course introduces students to the role of fieldwork in occupational therapy education and practice and provides students with opportunities to participate in non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences. The course provides students with a foundation for acquiring and developing a repertoire of beginning professional behaviors while engaging in service learning with individuals and organizations in the community. 1 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

OT-661. OT Clinical Correlate (Geriatrics). This course provides guided observation and participation in various aspects of the occupational therapy process during non-traditional, community-based Level I fieldwork experiences that emphasize wellness, enhancing quality of life, and engagement in occupation to support participation in context for older adults. Students interview and assess clients, participate in activity programming, plan and implement therapeutic groups based on clients' needs and interests, and document the occupational therapy process while applying concepts from previous and concurrent coursework. 1 S.H. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 644, OT 644L, OT 659

OT-664. Instructional Processes for Health Professionals. An overview of the principles of adult learning; instructional design; instructional methods, skills, media; and program development and evaluation for use in the health professions. Students will develop skill in formulating instructional design plans for adult learners in the health professions. Content will focus on academic, clinical, patient or community, in-service, and continuing education settings depending on the composition of graduate students and their respective health professions. 1-3 S.H. lecture.

OT-681. Independent Study. Students study a topic related to OT under faculty supervision. 1-3 S.H.

OT-695. Community Based Practice. Opportunity for individuals and/or small group of students to actively participate with faculty members or community preceptors in innovative community-based experiences that will improve the health needs of diverse communities. Students will gain experience examining how their professional skills may be harnessed to respond to the health objectives embedded in Healthy People 2010.  1-3 S.H.

OT-698. Professional Capstone Experience in Occupational Therapy. This course provides an intensive two-day seminar immediately following the completion of all three clinical practical. The seminar focuses on review of requisite skills for taking the national certification examination and readiness for entry into the practice environment. Attention is given to establishing a career trajectory, developing plans for continuing competence and ongoing professional contribution, and creating an effective balance between one's personal and professional lives. 1 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 642

OT-701. Neuroscience. This course thoroughly examines the structure and function of the human nervous system with emphasis on functional considerations related to clinical practice. This course includes a study of microscopic and macroscopic anatomical components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system with emphasis on the organization of functional systems. The neurophysiological principles which are related to neural transmission and function of the various structures and systems are examined. Signs and symptoms related to various pathological conditions affecting the nervous system are emphasized and students are expected to correlate the clinical manifestations with the anatomical location of the pathology. 4 S.H. lecture. Required. Pre-requisites: OT 716

OT-716. Human Anatomy. This course in gross anatomy provides students with the knowledge of clinical anatomy necessary to practice their expertise upon graduation. The contents of the course include gross anatomy and an introduction to anatomical radiology, and will be conducted to represent a survey of the entire human body. Teaching/learning methodologies will include lectures and discussions, prosected human cadavers, and computer applications. The course will be taught regionally (i.e. upper limb, lower limb, spine, etc.), and will survey all morphologic systems. 4 S.H. lecture, 1 S.H. lab. Required. Pre-requisites: Admission to the program

IP-710. Transforming Healthcare.  The course goal is to lay the foundations for beginning (first Year) professions students to understand the complexities of the health care system and the role of interprofessional collaboration to improve the system. Through an interprofessional context, students will explore the art and science of teamwork and communication skills, cultural competency, ethical issues, healthcare disparities and social determinants of health. This course addresses the university's Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) goals #2 (e.g., students learn more about the other professions) and #3 (e.g., students apply interprofessional teamwork competencies in a learning setting) and will provide a mechanism to evaluate student learning outcomes associated with each goal. 2 s.h.

  
Last Published with Edits:July 7, 2014 10:01 AM
Last Comprehensive Review: July 2014
 
 
 
 

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