MUSC Bulletin | College of Dental Medicine

Doctor of Dental Medicine | Course Descriptions

Required and elective course descriptions are listed by department. The course numbering system gives the department designation followed by the course number. The number of semester hours is designated by s.h.

Required Courses
Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Biochemistry_and_Molecular_Biology.

Department of Cell Biology & Anatomy
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Cell_Biology_and_Anatomy

CELL-621. Gross and Neuroanatomy. Emphasizes normal human gross anatomy from the functional point of view. Special emphasis is given to the head and neck. The material is presented in a number of ways: by regional dissections, by study of normal radiograms, and by lectures, outside readings, and textbook assignments. Presents basic concepts of central nervous system organization. The neuronal connections of the various systems and the morphologic relationships of the component parts of the brain are studied in detail. Functional and clinical correlations for the face and oral cavity are stressed. 8 s.h. Summer.

CELL-628. Basic & Oral Histology, Organ Micro-Anatomy, & Embryology. Develops knowledge of the structure and function of cell organelles and the histological features of the organization of cells into the four fundamental tissues, the microanatomy of the integument, oral cavity, and all organs of the body, and the development of the embryo from fertilization through the formation of organ systems. Special emphasis is given to the oral cavity, the special histology and development of the tooth, and the development of the head and neck. This course is primarily intended for dental students, although it is suitable for graduate students and certain health professions students who have a college equivalent education. 8 s.h. Fall.

Clinical Dental Practice
CLNDM-802, CLNDM-803, and CLNDM-807. Quality Assurance. The Quality Assurance courses are a formal and structured process that involves an ongoing review of patient records to assess the appropriateness, necessity, and quality of care provided. The Quality Assurance Record Review is the mechanism that facilitates this process. All assigned patient records are reviewed on a biannual basis. Junior and Senior students will be evaluated according to record management. timeliness of care, sequence of care, and recall care. 1.5 total s.h. Fall/Spring/Summer

CLNDM-805. Early Clinics I. During the first year, students in small groups are given a series of planned supervised exercises and experiences in clinical, community, and laboratory settings. Relevant experiences are provided in scaling and root planning techniques, assisting techniques in pediatric dentistry and prosthodontics, prosthodontic laboratory techniques, and outreach rotations. 3.5 s.h. Fall.

CLNDM-806. Early Clinics II. A continuation of CLNDM-805. 3.5 s.h. Spring.

CLNDM-810. Early Clinics III. During the second year, students continue rotations in the Early Clinic Program with the introduction of patient contact in the Maintenance/Recall rotation. Relevant experiences are provided in equipment maintenance, outreach, rubber dam technique, local anesthesia, suturing, and orthodontic model making. Students participate as dental assistants for the Pediatric and Oral Surgery Clinics. Students are introduced to the clinic procedures for oral diagnosis, dental laboratory, records room, dispensary, and orthodontics. 3 s.h. Fall.

CLNDM-811. Early Clinics IV. A continuation of CLNDM-810. 3 s.h. Spring.

CLNDM-812, 813, 814. Junior Clinics. Junior students are blocked in the following clinics: oral surgery, endodontics, operative, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, fixed and removable prosthodontics, oral diagnosis/radiology, and infection control. 36 total s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.

CLNDM-823. Treatment Planning Clinic I. Treatment Planning Clinic is an interdisciplinary clinical rotation. Students perform a thorough examination including a review of the medical history, soft tissue, hard tissue, radiologic, periodontal, occlusol, detection of caries, evaluation of defective teeth and edentulous spaces. A comprehensive treatment plan is formulated that includes possible biopsy, periodontal therapy, restorative and prosthetic options. Summer. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM-824. Treatment Planning Clinic II. Treatment Planning Clinic is an interdisciplinary clinical rotation. Students perform a thorough examination including a review of the medical history, soft tissue, hard tissue, radiologic, periodontal, occlusol, detection of caries, evaluation of defective teeth and edentulous spaces. A comprehensive treatment plan is formulated that includes possible biopsy, periodontal therapy, restorative and prosthetic options. 1.0 s.h. Fall.  

CLNDM-825. Treatment Planning Clinic III. Treatment Planning Clinic is an interdisciplinary clinical rotation. Students perform a thorough examination including a review of the medical history, soft tissue, hard tissue, radiologic, periodontal, occlusol, detection of caries, evaluation of defective teeth and edentulous spaces. A comprehensive treatment plan is formulated that includes possible biopsy, periodontal therapy, restorative and prosthetic options. 2.0 s.h. Fall.  

CLNDM-841. Hospital Rotation in Oral Surgery. One week rotation in OMS Clinic. Participating in Hospital and Clinic activities. Examining and treating patients under supervision. 1.0 s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.  

CLNDM-845. Oral Surgery Rotation. Each senior student is assigned to the Oral Surgery Clinic for three weeks. 3 s.h.

CLNDM-850, 851, 852. Senior Clinics. Senior students, when not assigned to rotations, work in infection control, endodontics, operative dentistry, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, periodontics, and fixed and removable prosthodontics clinics. 28.5 total s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.

CLNDM-872. Oral Diagnosis Rotation. Each senior student is assigned to the Oral Diagnosis Clinic for three weeks. 3 s.h.

CLNDM-880. Oral Head & Neck Cancer Clinical. This course provides clinical experience in the evaluation of patients with oral and other head and neck cancers. Participants will be exposed to patients recently treated for this disease. The participant will be exposed to the early detection, diagnosis, physical examination, treatment options and rehabilitation for oral, head, and neck cancers. A comprehensive head and neck examination will be described and a multidisciplinary treatment planning conference will allow the student a broad understanding of issues related to oral, head and neck cancer care. .5 s.h. Spring.

CLNDM-890. Orientation to Clinics. This course is designed to introduce the junior dental student to the clinic treatment areas.  Patient management, support services, and clinic protocol will be emphasized. 1.0 s.h.

CLNDM-892, 893, 894. Senior Attendance. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during the senior year. The rotation also allows the student the flexibility of choosing specific clinics in which to gain expertise. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 2.5 total s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.

CLNDM-896, 897, 898. Junior Attendance. This course is designed to ensure the student with a variety of clinical experiences during their junior year. Attendance can be satisfied by treating a patient, assisting with treatment of a patient, or working in one of the infection control clinics. Special clinical projects that receive prior approval by the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs are awarded attendance credit. 8 total s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.

CLNDM-901. Coastal Center Rotation. Senior students rotate to the Coastal Center Dental Clinic to provide all phases of general dentistry to the special needs population of the Coastal Center.  

CLNDM-904. Our Lady of Mercy Outreach. To provide the student with an understanding of the need for dental services to adult patients in the John's Island area.  Increase the student's ability to deliver preventive and restorative services.  To provide oral health treatment in a caring, culturally sensitive, and respectful manner. .5 s.h.

CLNDM-905. Horry Georgetown Rotation. Senior students will rotate to provide preventative and restorative services.

CLNDM-997. East Cooper Community Outreach. Senior Clinical rotation to the East Cooper Community Outreach Dental Clinic to provide basic operative dentistry to adults who live in the East Cooper area. The rotation will take place on Wednesday with a morning and afternoon session. Clinical supervision will be provided by Adjunct Clinical Faculty.

CLNDM-998. Provide comprehensive clinical experiences for senior dental students in partnership with Greenville Technical College and a coalition of dentists in the upstate. Dental care will take place at a number of venues to include; Greenville Technical DA and Hygiene Schools, federally qualified health clinics, outreach clinics, private practice offices, hospital operating rooms and a dental van.

Department of Craniofacial Biology

CRFB-601. Dental Biochemistry. An in-depth course emphasizing the basic metabolic reactions of living systems. Topics which are emphasized include, structure-function relationship of hemoglobin, myoglobin and enzymes, pH considerations, enzymatic activity and factors such as allosteric effectors and conversion of proenzymes to active enzymes, which affect enzymatic activity the biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. Topics which are covered in depth include pH and buffers, glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism, regulation of metabolism, the nature of genetic material and the relationship of the genetic code to protein synthesis. An introduction to genetic engineering, genetic diseases and chemotherapy is also presented. 3 s.h. Fall.

CRFB-624. Oral Immunology-Oral Biology.
Basic and clinical aspects of immunology. Course is oriented toward oral biology with emphasis placed on oral health and disease. Students are required to report on manuscripts from recent dental literature in the area of oral biology and oral immunology. 4 s.h. Spring.

CRFB-745. Topics in Craniofacial Biology.
Current and emerging topics in craniofacial biology will be presented and discussed in a Journal Club style format. Initially, a faculty member will introduce and direct all students in the discussion of literature concerning oral-related research topics. Subsequently, students will present topics using faculty-approved papers from top-tiered journals. Students will be expected to participate in active class discussions with other graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty.   .5 s.h. Fall/Spring.

CRFB-747. Craniofacial Biology Seminar Series. 
In this series, invited internal/external speakers and students will provide seminars based on their own research to members of the College of Dental Medicine. This is a great opportunity for the students to present their work in an informal setting and to receive constructive feedback on his/her studies from a large audience with different scientific backgrounds. Each graduate student will give at least one seminar yearly. Lectures will be supplemented with local as well as invited external speakers, whose research focus is on craniofacial biology.  .5 s.h. Fall/Spring.

CRFB-835. Preventive Dentistry. This course introduces prevention through reading, lecture and discussion of the burden, associated risk factors and prevention activities of specific oral diseases. Topics include dental and periodontal diseases, human motivation and tobacco cessation. The scientific basis for prevention activities is emphasized. 1 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-841. Public Health. This course provides an introduction to dental public health. Lectures include current dental public health programs, problems, organizations, research, and activities and their effect on the health of population groups. 1.5 s.h. Spring.

CRFB-870. Nutrition and Dental Health. This course is designed to acquaint the dental student with the role of nutrition in health, specifically related to disease processes affecting the oral cavity. Emphasis will be placed on the role of diet in the prevention of oral diseases and incorporation of nutrition in dental care. 1 s.h. Fall.

CRFB-902. Biochemistry Aspects of Oral Biology. This course presents core concepts divided into four separate modules. In the first two modules, concepts and oral biological significant of extra cellular matrix components and mineralized tissue components that affect the oral and craniofacial complex. In the third  module, basic and translational cell and molecular biological concepts are presented related specifically to cancer biology. Finally, the forth module presents various topics that specifically relate cell and molecular concepts related to the clincal practice of dentistry including wound healing, genetic testing for periodontal disease and blood clotting. 2. s.h. Spring.

Department of Oral Rehabilitation
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#General_Dentistry.

ENDO-811. Endodontic Technique and Rationale. To expose the dental students to basic endodontic treatment skills, so that as a newly graduating dentist students will be able to: treat single rooted endodontic cases with hand and rotary instrumentation, use dental dam isolation, use proper intracanal medicaments, and use prescriptive medications when indicated to attain successful treatment outcomes. 2 s.h. Fall.

ENDO-813. Endodontic Special Topics. Advanced course which expands the basic information given in ENDO-815. Special emphasis is placed on the correlation of endodontics with other disciplines. Principles to further aid the student in performing and assessing successful endodontic therapy are presented. 1 s.h. Fall.

ENDO-815. Basic Endodontics. To expose the sophomore dental students to the basics of endodontics, so that as a newly graduating dentist, students will be able to: perform a differential diagnosis, assess the difficulty of a case, treat pain and emergency cases, know anatomic variations of teeth, and how to effectively administer local anesthesia. 2.5 s.h. Fall.

GENDT-801. Dental Morphology. An introduction to the morphology of human teeth (permanent and deciduous), the relationships of dental anatomy to supporting periodontal structures, and other clinical implications of dental anatomy.
 3 s.h. Fall.

GENDT-805. Operative I. Includes the etiology, recognition, and classification of dental caries. The principles of cavity preparation and the restoration of various defects with silver amalgam are emphasized. 4.5 s.h. Fall.

GENDT-830. Operative II. The indications for cavity preparation and manipulation of composite resin, as well as aspects of other tooth-colored materials, are covered in detail. The indications for cavity preparation and manipulation of direct and indirect gold are also covered. 4.5 s.h. Spring.

GENDT-888. Preclinical Restorative Competency. This course is designed to assess each rising third year dental student's competency in basic restorative dentistry. It will be a written and manual assessment administered over two consecutive days during the exam week following the spring semester. .5  s.h. Spring

GENDT-890. Advanced Treatment Planning. This course is designed to advance the student’s knowledge of treatment planning complex dental cases requiring oral rehabilitation. Students will learn how health histories effect treatment plans, how occlusal problems should be recognized and managed as part of the overall treatment.  Treatment planning based on the patient’s financial situation will be included. 6 s.h. Spring.

GENDT-891. Technical Assessment I.  The purpose of this course is to assess each student's competency in techniques essential to patient treatment in restorative dentistry at the junior student level.  The exercise is designed and administered by faculty from academic divisions within the department and accomplished in the simulation laboratory. 1 s.h. Spring

GENDT-892. Technical Assessment II. The purpose of this course is to assess each senior dental students's competency essential to patient treatment in endodontics, fixed prosthodontics,  operative dentistry and removable prosthodontics at the senior student level.  All assessments are accomplished in the simulation laboratory and evaluated by department faculty.
.5 s.h. Fall   

IP-710. Transforming Healthcare. The course goal is to lay the foundations for beginning (first year) professions students to understand the complexities of the health care system and the role of interprofessional collaboration to improve the system. Through an interprofessional context, students will explore the art and science of teamwork and communication skills, cultural competency, ethical issues, healthcare disparities and social determinants of health. This course addresses the university's Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) goals #2 (e.g., students learn more about the other professions) and #3 (e.g., students apply interprofessional teamwork competencies in a learning setting) and will provide a mechanism to evaluate student learning outcomes associated with each goal. 2 s.h

Department of Materials Science

Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Materials_Science.

MATSC-801. Dental Materials I. The purpose of this course is to introduce the dental student to the various materials used in the practice of the dentistry including their composition, chemistry, properties, and applications. By gaining a better understanding of these materials, students will also be able to assess newer materials that are constantly being introduced into dentistry. Also, through hands-on laboratory exercises, students have the opportunity to manipulate and familiarize themselves with some of these materials before utilizing them in upper level courses. 2.5 s.h. Spring.

MATSC-805. Dental Materials II. The purposes of this course are: to provide a concise and summative review of the physical, chemical, and materials science principles which govern the behavior of the materials used in restorative dentistry; teach relationships among the basic properties of materials and clinical performance of restorations; introduce current products and advanced techniques in restorative dentistry; and to teach dental students how to analyze the dental literature and synthesize a postion on recent research or clinical techniques.2 s.h. Fall.

MATSC-806. Esthetic Dentistry. The course aims to expand the senior dental students knowledge of applications of advanced materials and clinical procedures for esthetic restoration of the dentition and maxillofacial complex.  Lecture topics include applications of composite materials and adhesives for esthetic restorations, ceramic restorations, maxillofacial prosthodontics, and an introduction to facial plastic surgery. 1.0 s.h. Spring.

MATSC-886. Independent Project. The purpose of this course is to provide third year dental students the experience of collecting, organizing and presenting to their peers a body of knowledge of value in modern dental practice. In the course, students select a topic based on their interest and identify a mentor to assist them in developing a table clinic presentation relative to the topic. Instruction and assistance is provided in topic and mentor selection. Information gathering and project presentation. 3 s.h. Spring.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Microbiology_and_Immunology.

MBIM-623. Microbiology for Dental Students. Microbiology is a core course in the dental curriculum that is intended to foster a knowledge base and understanding of the fundamentals of bacterial physiology and genetics; clinical bacteriology, virology, parasitology and mycology; antimicrobial therapy; asepsis in dentistry; and infection control. The primary goals of the course are to explore the relationship between the physiology of medically important microbes to the pathobiological sequelae of human-microbial interactions, with particular reference to the role of oral microbes in human disease. Emphasis is placed on the study of oral ecology, dental caries, periodontal disease, hepatitis and AIDS. Laboratory instruction includes problem based, small group exercises in microbiology, with specific sections on oral flora and aseptic techniques. 4 s.h. Spring.

Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin #Oral_and_Maxillofacial_Surgery.

OMFS-801. Oral Surgery I. A basic course in exodontia, alveoplasty, and intra-oral surgical procedures commonly accomplished by the general practitioner.1.5 s.h. Spring.

OMFS-805. Comprehensive Control of Pain and Anxiety in Dentistry. The anatomic, physiologic, and pharmacologic aspects of local anesthesia are discussed. Techniques of administration are taught. Preanesthetic evaluation and postoperative control of pain are discussed in depth. Additionally, the inventory, prescription, legal, and moral aspects of controlled drugs are discussed. Prerequisites: anatomy, physiology, pharmacology.1.5 s.h. Spring.

OMFS-806. Clinical Pathophysiology of Common Medical Conditions. This is a self-paced, student-oriented, seminar-type course enriched by lectures to provide the dental student with knowledge and skill necessary to obtund pain and to allay anxiety and fear in the dental setting. Lectures, demonstration, visual aids, and student participation are used to emphasize the techniques of oral, intramuscular, intravenous, and inhalation sedation. Other techniques including general anesthesia and hypnosis are covered in either lecture and/or demonstration. Prerequisites: third-year student, physiology, pharmacology, CPR instruction. 1 s.h. Summer.

OMFS-810. Physical Diagnosis. A lecture and demonstration course presented in multidisciplinary manner by representatives from various health specialty areas and particularly stressing those activities of a physical diagnostic nature that closely involve the head and neck structures.1 s.h. Summer.

OMFS-885. Advanced Concepts in Oral Maxillofacial Surgery. This course introduces the student to more complex diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. It will include clinical application of principles related to the advanced management surgical complications, treatment of the medically compromised patient, facial trauma, surgical orthodontics and orthognathic procedures, facial reconstruction, facial cosmetics, and evaluation and treatment of tempromandibular joint disorders.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Pathology_and_Laboratory_Medicine.

PATH-623. General and Systemic Pathology. This course is designed to provide an insight into the altered biochemical processes, disturbed physiology, and resulting morphologic changes that occur at the subcellular and cellular levels and within tissues of the body during the various diseases states.  The application of these principles is then applied to the various organ systems of the body and in the context of dental health where appropriate.6 s.h. Spring.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry/Orthodontics
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Pediatric_Dentistry_and_Orthodontics.

PEDOR-801. Pediatric Dentistry I. Lecture series introduces the realm of pediatric dentistry with particular emphasis on child development, tooth development, oral diagnosis, pathology, radiology, concepts of preventive therapies, and special considerations for the compromised child.1 s.h. Fall.

PEDOR-805. Pediatric Dentistry II. Lecture series. Course continues instruction in pediatric dental procedures to include restorative, pulpal, surgical, trauma and space maintenance therapies.1 s.h. Spring.

PEDOR-815. Pediatric Dentistry III. Lectures provide a more thorough discourse on topics of clinical and diagnostic procedures needed for dental treatment for the child and adolescent to include hard and soft tissue anomalies, medical emergencies, advanced behavior guidance procedures, child abuse and neglect and patients with special health care needs. 1 s.h. Fall.

PEDOR-820. Orthodontics I. Introduces the principles of orthodontics and their clinical applications through the study of normal and abnormal dental occlusions, normal and abnormal facial patterns, hereditary tendencies, and other etiological factors.2 s.h. Fall.

PEDOR-821. Orthodontics II. The principles of orthodontic appliance, their design and clinical application and construction are demonstrated in correcting various malocclusion of the child and adult patient. 2 s.h. Spring.

PEDOR-822. Orthodontics III. Integration of contemporary orthodontic treatment objectives, diagnostic procedures, and biomechanical approaches will be demonstrated through case presentation of interceptive, adjunctive, and comprehensive orthodontic treatments. .5 s.h. Summer.

PEDOR-823. Clinical Genetics. Reviews basic genetic principles, familiarized the student with the genetic approach to human disease, and exposes the student to a variety of genetic syndromes. The student enhances their diagnostic capabilities, is later able to contribute to the management and treatment of genetically compromised patients, and learns about the likelihood of occurrence of common birth defects.1 s.h. Fall.

PEDOR-825. Pediatric/Orthodontic Lab. Lab procedures in restorative care of pediatric patients with primary and young permanent dentitions. Supplemental diagnostic procedures (space analysis, cephalometric analysis) are performed.2 s.h. Summer.

PEDOR 900. Special Needs Patients Clinic.  To enhance the student awareness of the oral health problems of individuals with special health care needs, conduct oral health screenings in individuals with special health care needs, following standardized clinical protocol, assess the oral dental needs, formulate a dental treatment plan, and recognized the urgency of a dental treatment when appropriate. 1 s.h. Spring

Department of Pharmacology
Faculty listed on the web
http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Pharmacology_and_Experimental_Therapeutics

PCOL-621. Pharmacology. Teaches the fundamental principles and concepts of pharmacology. In the broad sense, this course is a study of the selective biologic activity of chemical substances on living matter. It presents the principles of drug absorption, distribution, and metabolism, the concepts of drug-receptor interaction, and the therapeutic uses and mechanisms of action of prototype drugs in each major drug group.4 s.h. Spring.

Department of Physiology and Neuroscience
Faculty listed on the web at
http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Physiology_and_Neuroscience.

NSCS-621. Physiology for Dental and Pharmacy Students. This course offered to both Dental and Pharmacy students is designed to present, in detail, the basic principles of human physiology. The core lectures are organized around a systems approach to the study of physiology, concentrating on each basic structural and functional unit of the human body. Emphasis is on understanding how cellular and organ systems function and how they are integrated and regulated by the body to maintain homeostasis. The course is primarily lecture-based and is supplemented with laboratory experimentation, clinical correlations and pathophysiology conferences. The Dental and Pharmacy students attend separate conference and laboratory sessions designed to reinforce and expand upon basic physiologic concepts with reference to their particular professions. 7 s.h. Spring.

Department of Oral Rehabilitation
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Prosthodontics.

FXPRO-801. Pre-Clinical Occlusion I. Develops an environment that allows the student to understand the function of the healthy stomatognathic system with major emphasis on the basic principles of mandibular movements and positions.2.5 s.h. Fall.

FXPRO-805. Fixed Prosthodontics I. This introductory course acquaints the student with the rationale and methodology of full veneer crown preparation, provisional restorations, and laboratory methods of constructing a cast gold restoration. All course materials are available in web-based format. Prerequisite: FXPRO-801.2 s.h. Spring.

FXPRO-806. Fixed Prosthodontics II. This course will emphasize tooth preparation for full veneer and partial veneer restorations. Preparations for fixed partial dentures will also be covered. Impression techniques, construction of provisional restorations, and laboratory procedures necessary for fabrication of cast restorations using the indirect technique will be presented. Discussion of pontic design, finish line configuration, and marginal fit as well as occulusal equilibration techniques. Prerequisite: FXPRO-805.2.5 s.h. Fall.

FXPRO-807. Fixed Prosthodontics III. This course is a continuation of Fixed Prosthodontics II. Special emphasis is placed on preparation and fabrication of ceramometal restorations. Also included is information on all-ceramic tooth preparation and alternate ceramic systems. Prerequisite: FXPRO-806. 3 s.h. Spring.

FXPRO-808. Fixed Prosthodontics IV. This course describes the basic Fixed Prosthodontic clinical techniques required to treat patients appropriately, advanced occlusal restorative procedures, and advanced diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This course also includes restoration of endodontically treated teeth. Prerequisite: FXPRO-807.1 s.h. Summer (May).

PROS-820. Implant Prosthodontics I. This course will introduce freshman student to the restoration of dental implants. The concepts for utilization of dental implants in restorative dentistry will be presented. This course will also provide basic information for the biological concepts for successful implants. 1.5 s.h. Spring.

PROS-821. Implant Prosthodontics II. This course is designed to advance the student's knowledge essential for providing mainstream implant restorative treatment.  The material in this course will include basic concepts of treatment planning dental implants for the edentulous and partially edentulous patient, construction of surgical templates, hands-on surgical placement overview, impression techniques, and implant crown fabrication. This course is a participation course consisting of both lecture and laboratory sessions. 1.5 s.h. Summer.

PROS-830. Dental Implantology. Dental Implantology has become a vital part of modern dentistry. This course is designed to teach the dental student essential information which will be utilized for comprehensive patient care. The course includes both surgical and restorative perspectives. The material will be taught by faculty and guest lecturers who have experience and expertise in the field of dental implantology. Prerequisite: Introduction to Implant Prosthodontics. 1 s.h. Spring.

PROS-901. Introduction to Dentistry. The first dental course the freshman students receive which will combine a dental assisting course, overview of the dental profession, library resources training and selected topics such as ethics, professionalism and challenges facing the dental professional. 1.5 s.h. Summer.  

RMPRO-811. Complete Dentures I. Preclinical introduction into the basic bio-mechanical theory and dental laboratory techniques involved in complete denture construction. Laboratory course will emphasize development of manual and laboratory skills required in the treatment of the edentulous patient. Patient treatment will be simulated on a mannequin.5 s.h. Fall.

RMPRO-813. Complete Dentures II. Clinical introduction into the treatment of the edentulous patient. Lectures will emphasize the clinical technique involved in each clinical appointment. Laboratory course is a continuation of RMPRO-811. Students will complete the dentures from the previous course and will learn denture repair procedures. Prerequisite: RMPRO-811.1.5 s.h. Summer.

RMPRO-835. Removable Partial Dentures. This course is designed to present appropriate background material and skills necessary to provide removable partial prosthodontic treatment. Major areas covered include diagnosis, treatment planning, design, mouth preparation, work authorizations, fabrication, delivery and maintenance of removable partial dentures. Prerequisite: RMPRO-811. 3.0 s.h. Spring.

RMPRO-845. Geriatric Dentistry. This course concentrates on the aging process. Topics emphasized include cultural attitudes toward aging, normal aging, and death and dying..5 s.h. Summer.

Department of Stomatology
Faculty listed on the web at http://myprovost.musc.edu/bulletin/#Stomatology.

STOMA-623. Stomatology.
A comprehensive overview of the general principles of pathology, etiology, cell injury, inflamation and repair,prinpciples of infection, and disturbances of growth, presented as an introduction to a more detailed consideration ofthe pathology of the organ systems and oral pathology. 4 s.h. Spring.

STOMA-800. Introduction to Oral Radiology. Lectures and demonstrations concerned with the physics involved in the production of x-rays and their interactions with matter. Also, the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the protection of patients, operators, and the environs are discussed.1 s.h. Fall.

STOMA 802. Periodontics 1. This lecture course teaches basic dental terminology, structures of the oral cavity, principles of hand instrumentation, periodontal examination procedures, review of medical and dental histories, instrument sharpening and fundamentals of patient plaque control.  1.5 s.h.

STOMA 803. Periodontics 2. A series of lectures in which the fundamentals of the nature of diseases of the periodontium, their etiologic backgrounds, prevention, histopathology, clinical recognition, and non-surgical treatment are covered in logical sequence. Prerequisite STOMA 802.1 s.h. Fall.

STOMA 804. Periodontics 3. A series of lectures in which the rationale, objectives and techniques of different types of periodontal surgical therapy, and principles of healing are presented to prepare the student for clinical periodontics.  Other topics include antimicrobial periodontal therapy and the relationship between periodontics and removable prosthodontics. Prerequisite STOMA 802, 803.1.5 s.h.

STOMA 805. Periodontics 4. The lecture portion of this course discusses occlusal examination procedures, fabrication of an occlusal nightguard, bruxism, and temporomandibular disorders.  The laboratory/clinical portion involves performing a detailed occlusal examination and fabrication of an occlusal guard.  Prerequisite STOMA 802-804.1.5 s.h.

STOMA 827. Forensic Odontology. Elective Course. Identification of human remains is generally a pre-requisite for estate planning, payment of life insurance proceeds, remarriage of the surviving partner and prosecution in cases homicide. Terrorist's attacks, aircraft accidents, fires, floods and high speed motor vehicle accidents increase the reliance upon the use of dental identification as the body may have suffered decomposition, mutilation or incineration. The teeth and their associated restorations are highly resistant to destruction and represent a sophisticated tool for post mortem identification of human remains. This seminar is designed to delineate the legitimate role of the forensic dentist with respect to dental identification, recognizing and reporting human abuse, determination of chronologic age, and dentistry's role in a mass-disaster setting. Emerging DNA technologies can be applied not only to human identification but also to bite mark evidence. This course highlights 21st Century technologies as they relate to forensic dental applications. 1 s.h. Spring

STOMA-836. Oral Radiographic Interpretation I. Lectures concerned with the principles and practice of radiographic interpretation, with emphasis on the recognition of normal radiographic anatomy, radiographic anomalies, and radiographic pathology. An introduction to clinical technique is also given. 1 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-838. Oral Medicine. Lectures and demonstrations presented in oral region structural examination, history recording and evaluation, diagnostic methods and procedures of both clinical and laboratory nature, and treatment planning and correlative application of these activities to total health care. Emphasis is placed on prevention, early disease detection, and interpretation of detected abnormalities of both local and systemic nature. 1 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-839. Oral Pathology I. Clinically-oriented lectures placing special emphasis on developmental, inflamatory, and neoplastic diseases of the head and the neck and on tissue changes in systemic diseases which frequently affect the oral cavity. Clinical correlation of basic principles of disease is stressed, along with methods of clinical diagnosis, radiographic interpretation, treatment methodology, and prognostic evaluation. Prerequisites: PATH-621, PATH-622.3.5 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-840. Oral Pathology II. Continuation of STOMA-839. Prerequisite: STOMA-839. 2.5 s.h. Spring.

STOMA-845. Clinical Diagnostic Conference. A seminar course designed to instill a method of thought approach helpful in establishing both a differential and definitive diagnosis. Problem-solving cases are presented with student participation required. The course emphasizes radiographic interpretation, laboratory medicine, treatment, methodology, and early recognition of head and neck cancer. Prerequisites: STOMA-839, STOMA-840.2 s.h. Summer.

STOMA-850. Senior Radiology: Advanced Topics. Updates the senior student’s knowledge of dental radiology. The course includes a more thorough discussion of the material included in Radiology I and Radiology II. Advanced topics are also discussed including TMJ radiography, extra-oral radiography advanced imaging modalities and intraoral digital imaging.1 s.h. Summer.

STOMA-855. Advanced Treatment Planning. A seminar course in which students present actual treatment plans for critique. The effect of oral and systemic disease and prosthodontic case design on long term prognosis is emphasized.2.5 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-880. Behavioral Science. Presents the basic concepts of successful patient management to the future health professional. Social consciousness and awareness relating to the health needs of the general population and its diverse groups are stressed during this early developmental study period.2 s.h. Spring.

STOMA-907. Oral Med II. Oral Medicine II is a preclinical didactic course that provides a broad base of information pertaining to the diagnostic process and how it relates to examination, evaluation and treatment of the patient. Emphasis is placed on treatment planning, case presentation, interpretation of local and systemic diseases, clinical pharmacology , oral pathologic lesions, and dental therapeutics.

STOMA-905. Practice Management I. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the business and financial aspects of the dental practice. Topics include contractual considerations, cost concepts, taxes, compliance issues, accounting, marketing, personal finances, electronic medical records, risk and insurance, negotiation and resolution of disputes in practice management and Mangement of Human Resources. Students are introduced to various situations that they may be confronted with in their dental practice.

STOMA-906. Practice Management II. Practice Management II is the second part of the continuum from Practice Management I taught in the spring of the junior year. The course teaches the student the basic principles and philosophies of practice management. The student becomes competent through a series of practical presentations from faculty and guest lecturers.

Elective Courses
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
MBIM-882. Advances in Periodontal Immunopathology.
An advanced course for junior and senior dental students and graduate dentists interested in the immunopathological aspects of periodontal disease. Discussions are conducted of recent papers on periodontal immunopathology, the mucosal immune response, microbial adherence to oral tissues, and immunologic mechanisms involved in periodontal bone loss. Laboratory demonstrations are provided. .5 s.h. Summer.

Department of Craniofacial Biology
CRFB-745. Topics in Craniofacial Biology. Current and emerging topics in craniofacial biology will be presented and discussed in a Journal Club style format.  Initially, a faculty member will introduce and direct all students in the discussion of literature concerning oral-related research topics.  Subsequently, students will present topics using faculty-approved papers from top-tiered journals.  Students will be expected to participate in active class discussion with other graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty. 0.5 s.h. Spring/Fall.

CRFB-747. Craniofacial Biology Seminar Series. In this series, invited internal/external speakers and students will provide seminars based on their own research to members of the College of Dental Medicine. This is a great opportunity for the students to present their work in an informal setting and to receive constructive feedback on his/her studies from a large audience with different scientific backgrounds. Each graduate student will give at least one seminar yearly. Lectures will be supplemented with local as well as invited external speakers, whose research focus is on craniofacial biology. 0.5 s.h. Spring/Fall.

CRFB-900. Mentored Dental Research Project. This course is intended for dental and Advanced Dental Education students who have little or no clinical dental research experience but have taken Introduction to Clinical Dental Research or have permission from a course director. Students will work with a chosen faculty mentor in consultation with a course director. 2 s.h. Summer/Fall/Spring.

CRFB-901. Introduction to Clinical Dental Research. This course is intended for dental and advanced dental education students who have little or no clinical dental research experience. The student will develop further understanding of the components of clinical dental research and will produce a clinical dental research proposal by the end of the semester. 2 s.h. Spring/Fall.

PEDOR-887. Advanced Behavior Management in the Child Patient. A series of seminars or topics ranging from personality assessment and goal setting to behavior modification techniques and communication skills. The student is exposed to advanced management philosophy and techniques to help deal with difficult children.1 s.h. Spring.

PEDOR-888. Adjunctive Orthodontic Procedures for Enhanced Adult Restorative Therapy. A series of seminars, supported by selected laboratory experience, will provide background information on biomechanical considerations of adjunctive orthodontic procedures in the adult patient. As defined, adjunctive procedures are limited procedures designed to facilitate other dental procedures and/or enhance functional-esthetic occlusion (e.g., molar uprighting, diastema closure). Appliance design, placement, management of active appliances and retention considerations are addressed for different procedures.1 s.h. Fall.

PEDOR-892. Craniofacial Genetics. This course is aimed at developing expertise in recognizing major and minor anomalies of the craniofacial structures and in relating these findings to specifics of general disorders. Special attention is given to the clinical delineation, natural history, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and risk of recurrence of heritable disorders affecting orofacial structures.1 s.h. Fall/Spring.

PEDOR-894. Clinical Practicum in Orthodontics I. This course involves advanced participation in clinical activities involving more comprehensive patient care, laboratory related procedures and case presentations.  Class size limited to four students. Predoctoral experiences. 2 s.h. Fall/Spring.

PEDOR-895. Clinical Practicum in Orthodontics II. This course involves advanced participation in clinical activities involving more comprehensive patient care, laboratory related procedures and case presentations. Class size limited to four students.

PEDOR 896-01. Clinical Practicum In Orthodontics III. This course involves advanced participation in clinical activities involving more comprehensive patient care, laboratory related procedures and case presentations.  Class size limited to four students.

STOMA-998. Ethics, Managed Care and Your Practice. Students will learn how business and managed care decision making depends on your ethics, and ultimately your success.1 s.h. Fall.

RMPRO-846. Special Topics in Removable Prosthodontics.  This elective consists of Removable  Prosthodontic topic not covered  in CD I & II or PRD. Post-op issues, dual path partials, single complete denture, PRD repairs, overdentures, adjunctive aids. .5 s.h.

RMPRO-847. VA Removable Prosthodontics.  10 week didatic/clinical program to include diagnosis and treatment of varied removable prosthodon. 1 s.h



RMPRO-847. VA Removable Prosthodontics.  10 week didatic/clinical program to include diagnosis and treatment of varied removable prosthodon. 1 s.h

Department of Prosthodontics

PROS-900. Rotation in Maxillofacial Prosthodontic Clinic. This elective consists of a clinical rotation through the Maxillofacial Prosthodontic Clinic. The student will observe maxillofacial prosthodontic procedures including intra-oral prostheses and extra-oral prostheses, implant prosthodontics procedures, and the interaction of the maxillofacial prosthodontist in a hospital setting. Also, the student will interact with the laboratory technician and/or anaplastologist in the laboratory phases of extra-oral prostheses and intra-oral prostheses (both fixed and removable).1.5 s.h. Fall/Spring.

Department of Materials Science

Department of Stomatology
STOMA 811. Alternative Medicine - Herbal.
Elective Course - could be 1/2 Fall Semester 6-8 weeks to introduce students to alternative therapies (Integrative Medicine) and Herbal Medicine.

STOMA-883. Oral Histopathology I. Provides the opportunity to study the histopathology of oral diseases. Before each session, the student is required to study and make diagnoses on a series of oral and para-oral lesions. The diagnoses and histopathological features of each week’s cases are then discussed in the weekly conference.2 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-884. Oral Histopathology II. A continuation of STOMA-883. Prerequisite: STOMA-883.2 s.h. Spring.

STOMA-904. Geriatric Dentistry. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the challenges facing dental practitioners in an aging society with emphasis on providing dental care for older patients more safely and effectively. .5 s.h. Summer.

STOMA-905. Practice Management I. This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the business and financial aspects of the dental practice. Topics include contractual considerations, cost concepts, taxes, compliance issues, accounting, marketing, personal finances, electronic medical records, risk and insurance, negotiation and resolution of disputes in practice management and Management of Human Resources. Students are introduced to various situations that they may be confronted with in their dental practice. 1.0 s.h. Spring.  

STOMA-906. Practice Management II. Practice Management II is the second part of the continuum from Practice Management I taught in the spring of the junior year. The course teaches the student the basic principles and philosophies of practice management. The student becomes competent through a series of practical presentations from faculty and guest lecturers. 1.0 s.h. Fall.

STOMA-907. Oral Medicine II. Oral Medicine II is a preclinical didactic course that provides a broad base of information pertaining to the diagnostic process and how it relates to examination, evaluation, and treatment of the patient. Emphasis is placed on treatment planning, case presentation, interpretation of local and systemic diseases, clinical pharmacology, oral pathologic lesions, and dental therapeutics. 1.0 s.h. Spring.  

Clinical Dental Practice
CLNDM-860. VIM Clinical Rotation.
This course is a clinical rotation in General Dentistry at the Volunteers in Medicine Dental Clinic at Hilton Head, SC.  Students will provide clinical care to patients under direction and supervision of VIM dentists, who have clinical faculty appointments in the Department of General Dentistry - MUSC College of Dental Medicine. 1.0 s.h. Spring.

CLNDM-870. Extramurals. Extramural programs are offered in cooperation with the Area Health Education Center and the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium. A series of extramural experiences are required which must total two weeks. These experiences introduce the senior to the practice of dentistry outside the University. Various rotations are available including rural areas and hospital environments (working with patients with special needs, etc.).2 s.h. Fall.

CLNDM-901. Coastal Center Rotation. Senior students rotate to the Coastal Center Dental Clinic to provide all phases of general dentistry to the special needs population of the Coastal Center. .5 s.h.

CLNDM-997. East Cooper Community Outreach. Senior clinical rotation to the East Cooper Community Outreach Dental Clinic to provide basic operative dentistry to adults who live in the  East Cooper area.  The rotation will take place on Wednesday with a morning and afternoon session. Clinical supervision will be provided by Adjunct Clinical Faculty. 
 
CLNDM-998. Greenville Tech Rotation.
Provide comprehensive clinical experiences for senior dental students in partnership with Greenville Technical College and a coalition of dentists in the upstate. Dental care will take place at a number of venues to include: Greenville Technical DA and Hygiene Schools, federally qualified health clinics, outreach clinics, private practice offices, and hospital operating rooms.

CLNDM-904. Our Lady of Mercy. To provide the student with an understanding of the need for dental services to adult patients in the John's Island area.  Increase the student's ability to deliver preventive and restorative services.  To provide oral health treatment in a caring, culturally sensitive, and respectful manner. .5 s.h.

CLNDM-905. Horry Georgetown Rotation.
Senior students will rotate to provide preventative and restorative services primarily for Pediatric patients on site. Adjunct faculty will supervise the students.  


Note:  Other university elective courses are offered to dental students.

 
Last Published with Edits:September 26, 2013 4:34 PM
Last Comprehensive Review:Fall 2013
 
 
 

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