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College of Graduate Studies

First Year Curriculum

  First Year Curriculum Calendar

Spring Courses

Fall 2016 Calendar (pdf)

BIOMOLECULAR, GENETIC AND CELLULAR ESSENTIALS I

An integrated curriculum comprised of three consecutive courses (CGS 765, CGS 766 and CGS 768) and one concurrent course (CGS 768) presents a foundational study of cell structure and function from biochemical, genetic, molecular and cell biological perspectives. The full curriculum is taken by all first-year biomedical science PhD students, but individual courses can also be taken by others. The participation of relatively few faculty ensures a cohesive presentation of material with “foreshadowing” and “retrospective” integration across topics. Didactic sessions will include lectures, presentation of data from the literature, discussion, and small-group exercises. Notably, the consecutive courses include occasional Friday “THINK” (thoughtful integration of new knowledge) sessions, which enable an in-depth discussion of specific topics that illustrate and integrate concepts developed in class. This iteration of underlying principles within the context of a specific biological problem or mechanism helps students grasp the importance of fundamental principles to their future research questions.

Course times and location
Each of the three consecutive courses meets from 9:00 am -11:00 am on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, and from 9:00 am -12:00 pm on Fridays. Class meet in BSB 435.

Format and texts
Attendance at all classes is required of all students. Course directors and instructors will outline the key objectives to students as the classes progress. The didactic sessions will include lectures, discussion, presentation of data from the literature, and group exercises. As required, students will be assigned to small groups for problem-solving sessions or to utilize internet-based or software-based searches for protein motifs or domains. Active engagement of the students will be important, although much of the foundational material will be presented in lecture format. The THINK sessions will introduce new topics of discussion and will serve to illustrate and integrate principles discussed in the more general lectures. These sessions (3 hours in length) will be particularly suited to discussion and problem solving.

The assigned textbook for the three consecutive Fall courses is the 6th edition of “Molecular Biology of the Cell”, edited by Alberts et al. Incoming students will have been given introductory chapters to learn and/or review over the summer prior to matriculation. During the courses, students will be assigned reading and/or problems from the book. Additional reading materials in other textbooks or review articles may be assigned as needed, and materials from the scientific literature may also be used in class. All lecture power-points, required readings and assignments will be posted in advance on Moodle.

Evaluation
Closed-book, in-class examinations will determine students’ grasp of the fundamental quantitative and qualitative material presented in class, and will also prompt students to apply the fundamental principles they have learned to current topics of biomedical inquiry. Exams will be designed to integrate material from different classes to minimize compartmentalized learning and maximize "bigger picture" thinking. Questions will be of the long-answer format, and may require students to solve problems, design experiments or propose models. Students will be encouraged to complement their written responses with models and figures in order to develop visual aid skills to convey complex concepts effectively. Faculty will also evaluate the attendance, preparation, and participation in class discussions and group exercises. Student participation in THINK sessions will be assessed on student preparation and participation in discussion and contribution to small group and individual activities. Final course grades will reflect overall student participation (10%), participation in the THINK sessions (10%) and the examination (80%). The course will utilize the E*value system to obtain student feedback and faculty evaluation. Exam performance and class participation will be assessed using the following rubrics.

Participation Rubric

Criterion

Needs improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Active participation

Does not contribute

Responds to direct queries, sometimes volunteers

Often volunteers, initiates new discussions on topics related to class topic

Relevance of participation to topic under consideration

Contributions are sometimes off-topic or distracting

Contributions are always relevant to discussion

Contributions are relevant and promote in-depth or novel analysis

Evidence of level of preparation

Does not appear to have read the material in advance and/or has little comprehension

Comes prepared to class and can take advantage of opportunities for discussion

Comes prepared and may bring additional material into discussion beyond what was assigned

Listening/ cooperation

Inattentive, doesn’t respect or contribute to team

Participates regularly, responds well and contributes to team

Participates well and shows leadership: promotes active participation by others

Examination Rubric

Criterion

Needs Improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Clarity / Organization

Responses are incomplete or use poor grammar and punctuation, are disorganized, connections are not clear and/or transitions are not smooth

Responses are adequate and are reasonably well organized, connections are generally clear and most transitions are smooth

Responses are well thought out and organized, utilize proper grammar, connections are clear and transitions are smooth

Comprehension

Provide responses that only repeat class material and/or are fatally flawed in terms of logic

Provide responses that merely repeat facts with no integration of concepts and/or exhibits minor flaws in logic

Provide logical responses beyond what is presented in class, integrates literature and class material, and exhibits independent thinking

The three consecutive core courses are as follows:

Quicklist

Proteins: Dynamic Structure and Functions (CGS 765)

Course Description
The 18 sessions of this 5-week, 3 credit hour course present fundamental principles of protein structure and function. Proteins, the most abundant and diverse family of macromolecules within the cell, play a myriad of essential catalytic and structural roles within the cell. They undergo multiple post-translational modifications and interact with numerous partners, including other proteins, RNA, DNA and membranes. These topics will be considered within the context of health and disease, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms underlying fundamental cellular processes and underscoring the impact of mutant proteins on cell behavior and the importance of proteins as therapeutic targets.

Course Directors
The course will be co-directed by Drs. Craig Beeson (843-876-5091) and Shaun Olsen 843-876-2308). Dr. Beeson has a long track-record as a professor in the first-year curriculum for CGS PhD and MS students, and his participation in the current course reflects his knowledge base in protein chemistry and his teaching experience in this area. Dr. Olsen is an Assistant Professor whose expertise is in structural biology and enzymology, and he has served on the First Year Task Force that has redesigned the CGS curriculum for this coming year. Thus, these two professors are ideally suited to lead the first module in this curriculum. Continuity within the  course will be facilitated by the fact that the co-directors will be teaching ≥ 12 of the 18 classes.

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Genes: Inheritance and Expression (CGS 766)

Course Description
The 25 sessions of this 7-week, 4 credit hour course present the fundamental principles of  inheritance, maintenance and expression of the genetic material. The first 6 sessions focus on the principles and practice of classical and molecular genetics, and the next 7 focus on the replication, repair and transmission of the DNA genome within the context of the mammalian mitotic and meiotic cell cycles.     The final 11 sessions focus on the expression of the genome, incorporating discussions of transcription, epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones, nucleolus and rRNA synthesis and maturation, mRNA processing, nuclear export and translation, and regulation by non-coding RNAs.

Course Directors
The course will be co-directed by Drs. Tilman Heise  (843-792-6979) and David Kurtz (843-792-5844). Dr. Heise has a long track-record as a professor in the first-year curriculum for CGS PhD and MS students, and his participation in the current course reflects his knowledge base in RNA biology and the regulation of gene expression and his teaching experience in these areas. Dr. Kurtz has also been a mainstay, and he has served on the First Year Task Force that has redesigned the CGS curriculum for this coming year. Thus, these two professors are ideally suited to lead the first module in this curriculum. Continuity within the course will be facilitated by the fact that the co-directors will be teaching 11 of the 24 classes, which represents the entire second block of the course. Dr. Traktman, the Dean of CGS, has been actively engaged in graduate education for >30 yrs and has significant experience teaching the topics assigned to her in the Molecular Genetics block of this course. Dr. Gangaraju and Dr. Smits are Assistant Professors with expertise in the areas that they will be teaching as well, and Dr. Mohanty has been teaching topics on DNA metabolism for several years.

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Cells: Organization and Communication (CGS 767)

The 18 sessions of this 5-week, 3 credit hour course address the fundamental principles of cell structure, compartmentalization, and function. The first 10 sessions focus on the structure, function and dynamics of the endomembrane systems of the cell, the cytoskeleton, major organelles and programmed cell death. The final 7 sessions address cell:cell and cell:matrix interactions and the complex process of signal transduction. The overarching principles involved in the process of signal transduction, which most often involves the transduction of a signal from an extracellular ligand to a nuclear response, will bring together the principles discussed in the initial part of this course and those discussed in modules I and II.

Course Directors:
The course will be co-directed by Drs. Amy Bradshaw (843-792-4959) and Robin Muise-Helmericks (musehelm@musc.edu, 843-792-4760). Dr. Bradshaw has a track-record as a professor in the first-year curriculum for CGS PhD and MS students, and her participation in the current course reflects her knowledge base in cell:cell and cell:matrix interactions and her teaching experience in these areas. Dr. Muise-Helmericks has also been an engaged teacher, has an active research program in cell biology and has served on the First Year Task Force that has redesigned the CGS curriculum for this coming year. Thus, these two professors are ideally suited to lead the third module in this curriculum. Continuity within the course will be facilitated by the fact that the co- directors will be teaching 8 of the 18 classes in this course. Dr. Gemmill also has significant experience as a cell biologist and a teacher in the CGS curriculum. Drs. Olsen and Kurtz have served as members of the First Year Task Force, and along with Dr. Muise-Helmericks will facilitate integration of this course with the first two modules of the curriculum.

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The concurrent core curriculum course is:

Techniques and Experimental Design (TED) (CGS 768)

Dr. Jennifer Isaacs, Course Director
Cell and Molecular Pharmacology
Hollings Cancer Center, HO702E
843-792-8393
isaacsj@musc.edu

Time/Location
Wednesday 9:00 am -11:00 am
Course meets Wednesday August 24 - Wednesday December 14
BSB 435

Course Description
TED represents a unique and timely approach to learning. The topics covered in TED synch with the fundamental concepts covered within the Core Curriculum course (CGS 765-767). TED highlights essential tools and approaches required to achieve a high level of competency in biomedical research. Students will be equipped with the knowledge necessary to tackle protein biochemical studies such as protein isolation, understand the basics of genetics, including the use of cutting edge gene editing strategies and execution of genetic screens, and gain exposure to central concepts and approaches highly relevant to cell biology. Collectively, this training is expected to provide students with foundational knowledge and an invaluable toolkit that will collectively prepare students to successfully embark on their thesis research.

Grading
25% of the final grade will be based upon student participation. In addition to a didactic lecture component, the lectures will consist of interactive discussions whereby students will be encouraged to discuss conceptual aspects of experimental design and applicable components thereof. The remaining 75% of the merit grade will be determined by student performance on 3 exams, with each exam comprising 25% of the overall grade. Each exam will be a take home format wherein students have 1 week to complete the assignment. Exams will consist of a defined and interconnected set of hypothetical research questions that the student is asked to resolve via a rationally selected experimental approach or suite of approaches, drawn from the lecture material from the corresponding block. The objective of the exam is to evaluate whether the student has appropriately integrated the material within a conceptual and analytical framework. The Course Director will ensure that the instructor-designed questions facilitate conceptual integration and reflect this philosophy.

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BIOMOLECULAR, GENETIC AND CELLULAR ESSENTIALS II

First Year Curriculum Calendar

Two semester-long courses and six five-week-long mini-courses are offered in the Spring semester of the First Year Curriculum. Students enroll in CGS 772 (Learning from the Literature) and CGS 770 (Principles, Practices and Professionalism) and also enroll in three consecutive mini-courses. CGS 772 and CGS 770 are 2 credit-hour courses that meet once a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays respectively, from 9:00 am to 11:00 am. The mini-courses are also 2 credit-hours, and meet from 9:00 am to 11:00 am on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

Mini Courses

 

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Principles, Practices and Professionalism (CGS 770)

Credit Hours: 2.0
Thursdays, 9:00am - 11:00am

Course Co-Directors:
Ed Krug, PhD (primary contact)
Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology
Office: BE 101
Telephone: 843-876-2404

Co-director TBD

Course Justification In acquiring graduate level understanding of the foundations of macromolecular structure, function and dynamics, inheritance and expression of genes, and cellular organization and communication, it is essential that students also develop facility in critical thinking, an awareness of responsible conduct of research, the imperatives of rigor, transparency and reproducibility, and a sense of the professional career opportunities available to them and how best to ensure success in realizing those goals. This course seeks to fulfill these requirements.

Course Description This semester-long course introduces graduate students to essential concepts in the practice of biomedical science, such as critical thinking, responsible conduct of research, reproducibility of data, transparency in communication, rigor in experimental design and analysis, and professional development. The course utilizes didactic lectures, group activities based on hypothesis development, student discussion of case studies, and a range of skills focused on optimal development of career options.

Course Objectives The objectives of this course are to give students an understanding of the processes involved in deploying critical thinking in approaching a problem by development of testable hypotheses, and to reinforce that understanding by a series of exercises focused on determining the degree of rigor and reproducibility inherent in a given experiment approach to testing a hypothesis. Additional objectives of the course are to inculcate adherence to best practices in the conduct of research by reviewing standards of ethical conduct, the spectrum of federal and other regulations regarding research, and emphasis on the prerequisites and pitfalls of scientific publication. Lastly, a series of objectives relating to development of productive mentor-mentee relationships, optimal approaches to participation in team science and charting of career options following graduation will be addressed.

Course Format This 2 credit hour course will be given over a period of 16 weeks. Each class will be 2 hours in length and will meet Thursdays in the Spring semester. The instructors will provide an overview of their given topic at the beginning of their section. The objective of didactic lectures will be to lay the foundation for active development of assigned group exercises (ie, hypothesis development) and discussion of articles or other resources related to the specific skills addressed in that section. All students should come prepared to present, discuss and question all aspects of assignments. Specific goals and objectives of each class session are detailed in the syllabus.

Grading and Attendance Policy The course will be Honors/Pass/NoPass. Student grades will be based on attendance, timely completion of all assignments and quizzes, and scoring a minimum of 80% on the CITI exam. Those students who repeatedly take a “leadership” role in discussions and whose written work is considered “exemplary” will be given an honors. Students will be allow one excused absence with justification. Any missed assignments related to the absence must be remediated within the following week. Assessment tools will include the following:

  • Activities
    • Small group projects
    • Small group discussion
  • Quizzes (on-line)
  • Elements of formulating an hypothesis and experimental design
  • Plagiarism
  • Pre-assessment of knowledge of plagiarism
  • Presenting examples of research misconduct in the press to the class
  • Essay on summative impact of course for them personally (the “take home” impact) and how they will integrate it into their training as a graduate student at MUSC
  • CITI Biomedical Responsible Conduct of Research (9 modules).  Because training in RCR and RTR is mandated by the NIH and considered to be an essential component of scientific practice and professionalism, the students should be comfortable with the full scope of scientific compliance even if their near-term project doesn’t involve some of the areas being covered.
  • Assignments
  •  Exam

Participation in class discussions  Students must read the assigned materials in advance and are expected to contribute to class discussions. The course co-directors will monitor the class discussion and facilitate participation by those reticent to contribute.

Faculty Roster

  • Critical Thinking in Science series: (faculty yet to be recruited)
  • Responsible Conduct of Research series:
    • Ed Krug, Professor of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, MUSC Research Integrity Officer, 876-2404
    • TBD biostatistics faculty – for reproducibility session
    • Susan Sonne, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Chair of IRB2,
    • MA McCrackin, Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine,
    • Christine Dixon-Thiesing, Licensing Officer, MUSC Foundation for Research Development,
    • Mary Evelyn Armstrong, Conflict of Interest Officer
  • Professional Development series:
  • Craig Beeson, Associate Professor of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Research,
  • Ed Krug, Professor of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, MUSC Research Integrity Officer, 876-2404
  • Other potential instructors
  • TBD external speaker
  • Panel of TBD senior graduate students and postdocs

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Date

Topic

Instructor

1/12

Critical thinking in science I

This initial session is focused on presenting the concept of “critical thinking” and the processes involved in addressing a problem in this way.  Critical thinking underlies scientists’ ability to formulate hypotheses and design, execute and analyze experiments.

Activity: lectures

Paula Traktman,

invited speaker with philosophy of science, logic or critical thinking backround

1/19

Critical thinking in science II: Hypothesis Development

In mid-December of the prior term, students will have been given a cell-based problem (with preliminary data). They will have been asked to work independently to develop a hypothesis and perhaps an outline of key experiments that would be needed to test the hypothesis.  In class, students will work in teams of 6-8 to compare their individual hypotheses and work together to formulate a stronger, consensus hypothesis.  They will also be asked to develop an experimental approach to test their hypothesis. A designated individual from each group will report out the the class.

The skills being developed in this class include the ability to work in collaborative teams and to think critically about hypothesis development, experimental design and controls, and key variables.  Moreover, the concept of a “decision tree” will be introduced.

Pre-class activity: video on Creating a Hypothesis”

In-class activity: small working groups; class discussion

TBD

1/26

Critical thinking in science III: Hypothesis refinement and data assessement.

Faculty will provide “data” that addresses the experiments proposed by the student groups on 1/19.  The data will have a degree of scatter reflective of real life results.  Students will work in groups to discuss the data provided, assess their impact on the validity of their hypotheses, and determine what other data are needed to refine their hypotheses.

Pre-class activity: video on Elements of Experimental Design”

In-class activity: small working groups; class discussion

TBD

2/2

Responsible Conduct of Research I: Rigor, Reproducibility and Transparency of Research

This session will address biological and chemical variables and the limitations of different models and strategies.  Validation of cell lines, the specificity of antibodies, the limitations of various expression vectors, the importance of strain and sex and key variables in animal studies will be addressed.  The students will work together in their groups to discuss how these issues might impact the experimental design from the preceeding class.

Activity: lecture and small working groups

TBD

On-line Quiz #1: key elements of formulating an hypothesis and experimental design

2/9

Responsible Conduct of Research II: Data Management

Key concepts will be the elements of a proper scientific notebook and record keeping, the “dos and don’ts” of image processing, best practices and conventions in assembling scientific data, basic and necessary statistics (eg., standard deviation vs. error, p value), the importance and distinctions between experimental and technical replicates, and the criteria for data exclusion.

Activity: lecture and discussion of case studies

Ed Krug

& MUSC biostat faculty

2/16

Responsible Conduct of Research III: Authorship, Peer Review, and Plagiarism

This session will be focused on authorship and peer review including:  authorship criteria, confidentiality in peer review, and plagiarism. Students will be introduced to iThenticate, a plagiarism detecting software.

Pre-class quiz: student opinions of potentially plagiarized text

Activity: lecture and discussion of case studies

Ed Krug

On-line Quiz #2: plagiarism

2/23

Responsible Conduct of Research IV: Misconduct

This session will focus on the definition of research misconduct, where/how/when to report misconduct, and whistleblower protection.

Activity: lecture and student presentations of potential or real research misconduct reported by the press

Ed Krug

3/2

Responsible Conduct of Research V: Human Subjects and Animal Use in Research

This session will focus on regulatory and training requirements overseen by the Institutional Review Board and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.

Activity: lecture and general class discussion of hypothetical scenarios

Susan Sonne and MA McCrackin

3/9

Responsible Conduct of Research VI: Commercialization of Research

This session will focus on the issues to be addressed when research leaves the lab and enters the world of business.  Areas of discussion will include conflict of interest, conflict of commitment, disclosures, intellectual property, and commercialization.

Activity: lecture and general class discussion of hypothetical scenarios

Christine Dixon and Mary Ellen Armstrong

Spring Break

3/23

Responsible Conduct of Research VII: Questionable Research Practices

There is growing concern that lack of reproducibility stems from unintentional/intentional lapses in judgement about both experimental rigor and communication of key issues within collaborations. The purpose of this session will be to alert students to issues and behaviors that can impact their research productivity.

Activity: lecture and discussion of in-class video of the Robert Gallo/HIV controversy

Ed Krug

On-line Exam: CITI Biomedical Responsible Conduct of Research (9 modules)

3/30

Professional Development I: Mentor-Mentee Relationships and Individual Development Plans

The goal of this selection is to guide students in the development of an effective mentor/mentee relationship and to provide them with the tools needed to take ownership of their own development.

Topics of interest include how to select a mentor, the discussion of expectations and responsibilities of both mentor and mentee, the need for annual evaluations and consistent feedback, the need to develop, discuss and utilize an IDP, the need to establish personal/ professional boundaries, and the importance of understanding approaches to conflict resolution.

Pre-class Activity: students create a myIDP self-assessment

Activity: lecture and small group role-playing and discussion

Craig Beeson

and Ed Krug

4/6


 

Professional Development II: Navigating Your Graduate Training

One of the goals of this session is to present and discuss the timeline for milestones within PhD training.  These milestones include: establishing a dissertation committee, taking qualifying exams, preparing and defending a thesis proposal,  setting up annual committee meetings, moving towards a defense, and looking for a new position.  In additional to the timelines, areas such as committee composition and moving towards the next position will have a more substantive discussion. The second goal of the session is focused on issues of time management, networking, and seeking out career development experiences and opportunites.

Activities: lecture and small group discussion

(Don Menick)

and Ed Krug

4/13

Professional Development III: IV: Working with Others

The first goal of this session is focused on cultural sensitivity, diversity, and unconscious bias as it pertains to working to others. The second goal of this session is to discuss working with others within the lab, the institution, and in the larger scientific environment.

Activity: lecture and small group discussion of case studies

(Colleen Hanlon)

and (Heather Davidson)

4/20

Professional Development V: Science Communication

This session will focus on presenting yourself as a professional, preparing effective visual aids, and learning to excel at verbal and written scientific communication in a range of modalities to varied audiences.

Activity: lecture and class participatory exercises

(Tom Smith) and (Kimberly McGhee) and (Sheila Champlin)

4/27

Professional Development VI: Successful Strategies for Career Advancement

The goal of this session is to make students aware of the import role of a supportive research community to their career advancement. The ARROWS group will present on career development strategies and “worklife” balance. Students will learn about the role of Counseling and Psychological Services and practice some stress-reduction exercises. An interactive session with senior students and postdocs will address how they dealt with graduate coursework and lab-related challenges.

Activity: lecture, class participatory exercises, and panel discussion

 (Carol Feghali-Bostwick) and (Alice Libet)



Panel: senior students and postdocs

5/4

Professional Development VII:  Finding Your Own Professional Style

An external speaker will be invited to emphasize the broader picture of career success and introduce students to the benefits offered by scientific organization that go beyond the presentation of one’s research.

Activity: lecture and class participatory exercises

External speaker (e.g. Kevin Grigsby from AAMC)

Assignment: one page essay of “take home” messages from entire course

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Learning From the Literature (LFTL) CGS 772

Credit hours: 2
Jan 10 - May 2
Tuesdays, 9:00am - 11:00am

Description and Objectives

The LFTL course is one of the key elements of the redesigned first-year curriculum, and emerged from the work of the First Year Task Force. The Fall curriculum is focused on providing a solid foundation in the basics of cell structure and function from biochemical, genetic, molecular and cell biological perspectives. In addition, the students receive a complementary course in techniques and experimental design. In the Spring semester, the students will take three consecutive courses (chosen from a pool of 6) that introduce them to such disciplines as cancer biology, human genetics/genomics, physiology and pharmacology, metabolism and bioenergetics.

One of the key transitions made by students is the transition from learning what is known to exploring what is not yet known, and moving from textbook learning to the reading of the literature. After consideration of the “skills” we felt important for developing scientists, as well as the knowledge base, the concept of LFTL emerged. LFTL is focused on helping students understand HOW to learn from the literature. How does one approach a manuscript and understand the background, the hypothesis and the experimental design? How does one critically evaluate the data and incorporate them into what’s known about the system?

The syllabus has been formulated to address each of these questions. The students will learn by example as well as by practice. Opportunities for working individually and in groups will be plentiful, and discussion of the different ways in which data can be presented and interpreted will be central to the course. LFTL presents a concrete framework for the incorporation of “critical thinking” into the students’ education as they gain skill and confidence in “learning from the literature”.

Course Director and Instructors:
Dr. Paula Traktman will be the course director (843-876-2405, 843-876-2414).  Dr. Traktman has had a research laboratory for >30 years and extensive graduate teaching experience, and also serves as the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies.  As co-chairman of the First Year Curriculum Task Force, Dr. Traktman played an integral role in the development of LFTL. Several other members of the task force will play key instructional roles (Drs. OlsenMuise-HelmericksKurtz and Smolka). Other members of the MUSC faculty who have a track record as thoughtful instructors will be recruited to participated in LFTL, and we anticipate no difficulties in filling the roster with faculty who are enthusiastic about this new course.

Evaluation:
This course will be graded as “Honors, Pass and Fail”. Most of the grade will be based on participation; each student will participate in many discussions (35% of grade) and several presentations (35% of grade). At least two faculty members will evaluate student participation and presentation in the three LFTL sessions. Students will also submit 3 one-page review articles after the three LFTL sessions, and these will count for 30% of the grade, cumulatively.

E*value will be used to obtain feedback. The following rubrics will be used to evaluate the students; a grade of Fail will be given when >70% of the work is deemed “needs improvement” and a grade of Honors will be given when >70% of the work is deemed “exemplary”.  All other students will “Pass”.

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Participation and Presentation

Criterion

Needs improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Active participation

Does not contribute

Responds to direct queries, sometimes volunteers

Often volunteers, initiates new discussions on topics related to class topic

Relevance of participation to topic under consideration

Contributions are sometimes off-topic or distracting

Contributions are always relevant to discussion

Contributions are relevant and promote in-depth or novel analysis

Evidence of level of preparation

Does not appear to have read the material in advance and/or has little comprehension

Comes prepared to class and can take advantage of opportunities for discussion

Comes prepared and may bring additional material into discussion beyond what was assigned

Listening/cooperation

Inattentive, doesn’t respect or contribute to team

Participates regularly, responds well and contributes to team

Participates well and shows leadership: promotes active participation by others

Presentation Materials

Powerpoints are disorganized and uninformative

Powerpoints are clear, well organized, and informative

Powerpoints are not only clear and informative, but incorporate additional information, flowcharts, guides for the listener

Presentation Style

Presentation is disorganized and hard to understand

Presentation is organized and clear

Presentation is highly professional and articulate as well as organized and clear

Written work


Criterion

Needs Improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Clarity/Organization

Responses are incomplete or use poor grammar and punctuation, are disorganized, connections are not clear and/or transitions are not smooth

Responses are adequate and are reasonably well organized, connections are generally clear and most transitions are smooth

Responses are well thought out and organized, utilize proper grammar, connections are clear and transitions are smooth

Comprehension

Provide responses that only repeat class material and/or are fatally flawed in terms of logic

Provide responses that merely repeat facts with no integration of concepts and/or exhibits minor flaws in logic

Provide logical responses beyond what is presented in class, integrates literature and class material, and exhibits independent thinking

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LFTL Syllabus

Class

Date

Activity

Faculty

1

Jan 10, 2017

The Scientific Literature: Writing, Searching, Reading, Learning.

  • What are the components of a manuscript, and what constitutes a “publishable” piece of work ? What are the steps in submission and review ?
  • How do you “search” the literature using PubMed and automated journal searches ?
  • How do you “learn from the literature”? How can you assess the background, the premise, the data, the conclusions? This question will be the focus of the course.

Faculty TBD

Library TBD

2

Jan 17, 2017

Critical reading and extraction of a “story” from a manuscript

  • To illustrate, two faculty members will present one paper each, encouraging discussion.
  • Before the next class, students will be tasked with preparing 4 slides addressing one figure from an assigned paper: a) background/ hypothesis; b) flowchart of the experimental design, methods, and controls; c) the figure itself with a custom legend; and d) conclusions from the figure.

Findlay,

Wright

3

Jan 24, 2017 

Student presentations:

  • Students will work in six small groups to assemble a presentation of all the figures in the paper they have been assigned. They will then present to another group or to the whole class. “Best practices” will emerge.
  • In preparation for the first LFTL session (class 4), three papers on a topic not extensively covered in the Fall semester will be assigned to the six groups (1 paper/2 groups).

Wright,

TBD

4

Jan 31, 2017

Learning from the Literature I
This and the next two classes are the first of three LFTL sessions in the course.

Small groups will discuss their assigned paper and prepare a brief presentation highlighting the hypothesis/premise, one or two key figures, the impact of the work, gaps in critical thinking, and the key next step. 

A student from each of the 6 groups will present for 8-10 min. Although Groups 1 and 2 will present the same paper, the presentations will complement each other because the emphasis is on critical interpretation and next steps. Groups 3 and 4 will then discuss the 2nd paper, and then groups 5 and 6 the 3rd paper.

The class will end with discussion of how all three papers complement each other.

Traktman

5

Feb 7, 2017

Learning from the Literature I
same format as before, with three more papers on the same topic. The groups will stay the same, but a different student in each group will present.

Traktman

6

Feb 14, 2017

Learning from the Literature I
same format as before, but a different student in each group will present.

Following these 3 classes, all students will have read 3 papers in and been taught by their peers about 6 more. 18 of the students will have presented.

Assignment: All students will write a 1 page, single-spaced review of what the literature has taught them about this topic. The review will be due one week after class 6.

Assignment: Each student will be given a paper to read for the next class

Traktman

7

Feb 21, 2017

Back to Back: How can studies of the same problem using different model systems and experimental designs arrive at different conclusions?

In this and the next two classes, students will examine two “back-to-back” papers, published in the same journal issue, that address the same question from different perspectives.

Before class, three groups will study one paper and three groups will study the other. For the first 45 min in class, the groups will assemble a presentation of their paper. Group 1 will present the first paper for 20 min, and group 4 will present the other paper for 20 min. Members of the other groups will then lead the compare/contrast discussion for the remaining 25 min.

TBD

8

Feb 28, 2017

Back-to-back papers – Same format as class 7, but group 2 will present the first paper, and group 5 will present the other paper.

TBD

9

Mar 7, 2017

Back-to-back papers - Same format as class 7, but group 3 will present the first paper, and group 4 will present the other paper.

TBD

  

SPRING BREAK

 
10Mar 21How do paradigm shifts emerge from the literature?
Two faculty members will each provide a paper to the students to read prior to class. Each faculty member will each have one hour to present an example of a “paradigm shift” that emerged from the literature.
Smolka
Kurtz

11

Mar 28, 2017

Learning from the Literature II

Muise-Helmericks

12

Apr 4, 2017

Learning from the Literature II

Muise-Helmericks

13

Apr 11 2017

Learning from the Literature II “Review article” (1 page) due next class. Papers assigned for the last LFTL session

Muise-Helmericks

14

Apr 18, 2017

Learning from the Literature III Ubiquitination as a biological regulator

Olsen

15

Apr 25, 2017

Learning from the Literature III

Olsen

16

May 2, 2017

Learning from the Literature III “Review article” (1 page) due in 1 week.

Olsen

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Host & Microbe: Partners & Pathogens CGS 774

Credit Hours: 2
April 3-May 5
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am -11:00am

Course Description: Ever wonder what the little guys are like…I mean the REALLY little guys? The world is filled with diverse microbes from bacteria that kill us to viruses which are used to cure cancer. The complex interaction of these microbes with their hosts helps to shape both our daily health and to advance our understanding of life in its most basic forms. This course will introduce students to this amazing complexity by examining the fundamental characteristics of the bacteria and viruses which live both in and around us as well as how these tiny microbes have such oversized impact. So come explore the microbial world with us and learn what makes both them and us tick.

Course Objectives: The overall objective of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental aspects of both bacteriology and virology. Students will be encouraged to think about ways to apply this knowledge to advance their own research interests. Topics covered will involve microbial classification, structure, metabolism/physiology, life cycle, pathogenesis, transmission and behavior in bacteria, viruses, and fungi including their ecology, life in a biofilm and in association/interaction with host. A particular emphasis will be given to understanding of cellular/molecular characteristics and activities of bacteria and viruses and their relation to human health and disease. There will be also unified themes dedicated to emerging major bacterial and viral pathogens, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

Course Format: This 2 credit course will be given in 15 sessions spread over 5 weeks from April 3rd to May 3rd. The class format will be a short (30-45min) introductory lecture to introduce the daily topic followed by group discussion of primary literature (2-3 papers) which demonstrates and reinforces that topic. Students will be expected to read the primary literature prior to class and be able to participate in moderated discussion. Students will be given two homework sets during the course, one on bacteria and one on viruses. A final exam will be given during the final session.

Course Syllabus

Date

Lecture Topic

Lecturer (tentative)

4/3/2017

Bacteria: The Microbiome and Its Role in Health and Disease

Dr. Chad Novince

4/5/2017Bacteria: Introduction and the Importance of BacteriologyDr. Ozlem Yilmaz and
Dr. Nitto Chowdhury

4/7/2017

Bacteria: Effectors and Toxins

Dr. Keith Mintz
(Courtesy Lecturer, University of Vermont)

4/10/2017

Bacteria: Biofilms, Cell to Cell Communication and Quorum sensing 

Dr. Mike Schmidt

4/12/2017

Bacteria: Antibiotics and Resistance 

Dr. Christopher Davies

4/14/2017

Bacteria: Colonization, Opportunism and Persistence

First Homework Set: Bacteria Due 4/17/2017

Dr. Mike Schmidt

4/17/2017

Fungi: Biology and Pathogenesis

Dr. Carolina Westwater

4/19/2017

Virology: Introduction and the Importance of Virology

Dr. Cyndi Wright

4/21/2017

Virology: Cell Biology of Viral Infection

Dr. Paula Traktman

4/24/2017

Virology: Viral Oncogenesis

Dr. Paula Traktman

4/26/2017

Virology: Cellular Response to Virus

Dr. Eric Bartee

4/28/2017

Virology: Determinants of Viral Tropism

Dr. Eric Bartee

5/1/2017

Virology: Viral Transmission, Epidemiology and Zoonosis.

Second Homework Set: Viruses Due 5/1/2017

Dr. Laura Kasman and
Dr. Eric Meissner

5/3/2017

Malaria

Guest Lecturer (TBD)

5/5/2017

Final Exam

Drs. Ozlem Yilmaz and
Dr. Eric Bartee

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Course Directors
Özlem Yilmaz, DDS, PhD
Office: Basic Science Building 230G Office
Phone: 843-792-1248

Eric Bartee, PhD
Basic Science Building 208C
Phone: 843-876-2775

Teaching Assistant
Dr. Nityananda Chowdhury, PhD
Office: Basic Science Building 246C
Phone: 843-792-0780

Textbook and Reading Assignments:
- A textbook is not required for this class
- Primary literature reading assignments will be provided at least 2 days prior to class discussions via emails to the enrolled students or distributed following the previous class session.

Student Evaluation and Grading: Course grades will be assigned based on input from distinct assessments: Participation in class discussions, Take home questions, and a final exam.

Participation: Students will be expected to have read the primary literature provided prior to class and be able to participate in moderated discussion of that literature as well as how it fits into the overall daily theme. Participation will be assessed daily based on the rubric below by three independent faculty: Dr. Özlem Yilmaz, Dr. Eric Bartee, and Dr. Nityananda Chowdhury. Each of the four criterion listed will be scored 1-3 (see below). Each Independent grade will be determined using the following formula (100* (score/10)). Scores over 100% (ie scores of 11 or 12) will be set to 100%. Daily participation grade will be the average of all three assessments.

Criterion

Needs improvement = 1

Competent = 2

Exemplary = 3

Active participation

Does not contribute

Responds to direct queries, sometimes volunteers

Often volunteers, initiates new discussions on topics related to class topic

Relevance of participation to topic under consideration

Contributions are sometimes off-topic or distracting

Contributions are always relevant to discussion

Contributions are relevant and promote in-depth or novel analysis

Evidence of level of preparation

Does not appear to have read the material in advance and/or has little comprehension

Comes prepared to class and can take advantage of opportunities for discussion

Comes prepared and may bring additional material into discussion beyond what was assigned

Listening/cooperationInattentive, doesn't respect or contribute to teamParticipates regularly, responds well and contributes to teamParticipates well and shows leadership; promotes active participation by others
 

Homework Sets: Students will be given two homework sets during the course. Homework sets will be take home questions and will be due at the beginning of the following lecture session. Each homework set will consist of a series of 15-20 short answer questions designed to test basic knowledge. The goal of these homework sets will be to assess the student’s retention of the basic fundaments presented to them during the lecture/discussion sessions. Testing the student’s ability to synthesize new concepts from lectures is not the goal of these homework sets and will be assessed in the final exam.

Final Exam: Final exam will be an in class, closed book exam. Exam will be giving during final course session (May 3rd) and proctored by Dr. Özlem Yilmaz and/or Dr. Eric Bartee. Format of the final exam will be 2-4 short essay questions covering all material from the course. Exams will be graded by both Dr. Özlem Yilmaz and/or Dr. Eric Bartee. Grade will be average of scores from.

Weighted influence of assessments on overall course grade: Homework  Sets: 40%
Final: 40%
Participation: 20%

Final Grading Scale:
The final grade for the course will be based on the sum of the grades (weighted averages as described above) of the examinations for a total of 100%. A Student must have a final average grade of 69.5% or higher to pass the course. Merit grades are assigned on a continuous scale ranging from 0 to 4 points as detailed below.

% ScoreLetter GradeGPA

94 - 100%

A

4.0

86 - 93%

A-

3.67

78 - 85%

B+

3.33

70 - 77%

B

3.0

63 - 69 %

B-

2.67

55 - 62 %

C+

2.33

47 - 54 %

C

2.0

39 – 46 %

C-

1.67

0   - 38%

F

0.00

E*Value:
As part of our commitment to continuously assess our curriculum, students will be asked to evaluate courses and instructors through E*Value. These mandatory, confidential evaluations will be distributed electronically at the close of each semester, and students are asked to provide constructive feedback designed to enhance their education and experience in the College of Graduate Studies.

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Metabolism and Bioenergetics CGS 776

Credit Hours: 2.0
January 4 - February 7
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am - 11:00am

Course Co-Directors:
Craig C. Beeson, PhD (Primary Contact)
Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences
Office: QF309C
Tel: 843-876-5091

John J. Lemasters, MD, PhD
Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences
Office: DD504
Tel: 843-876-2360

Course Justification: Although basic elements of bioenergetics metabolism are imbedded in  curricula in most professional courses, there is little or no foundational material that covers the integration of bioenergetics at the levels of the cell, organ, or whole animal. There are also no courses that describe regulation of bioenergetics metabolism and its roles in human disease and pathology.

Course Description: Although the basic biochemistry and physiology of bioenergetics metabolism (i.e., glycolysis, mitochondria, etc) had their heydays in the 1950-1960s, it is common for many biomedical researchers to assume that we now know it all and it can be summarized in 1-2 chapters of a good biochemistry textbook. In contrast, even a brief perusal of current literature demonstrates about 2000 bioenergetics-related primary journal publications per year in nearly all fields of biomedical sciences. Indeed, with recent technological advances there has been a resurgence in research of bioenergetics metabolism with an emphasis on integration, regulation, and disease. The proposed course assumes a basic knowledge of bioenergetics metabolism and weaves this into a detailed exposure to the most current knowledge of how cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolism are integrated via cell signaling pathways, intracellular ultrastructure and redox physiology. The course incorporates new technologies in metabolomics and cellular imaging to illustrate how they contribute to ongoing studies of how dysfunction of bioenergetics metabolism contributes to diseases ranging from metabolic disorders, cancer, and degenerative pathologies.

Course Objective: The primary objective is to enable students to dissect the current literature with respect to what is the current knowledge of bioenergetics and metabolism as opposed to reliance on dated (although important) knowledge found in common textbooks. For example, it was widely assumed that energy production via glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration was largely a supply  versus demand process rather than being regulated via signaling pathways that converge with cell cycle, intercellular communication, and cell death. The predominant view of mitochondria still largely remains that of a small “sausage” shaped organelle rather than what is now known to be a dynamic morphological cycle whose regulation is highly complex. Finally, switching between different metabolic substrates and the associated bioenergetics pathways was viewed a being primarily supply driven  and  it  is  now  recognized  that  these  switches  can  control  immune  function,  oncogenesis,    and
degenerative  pathologies. In  a  nut, achievement of the  objective  will bring  the  students  into  22nd
century of bioenergetics and prepare them for the unfathomed future.

Course Format: The class will meet MWF, 0900-1100 for five weeks and it will rely on the didactic recitals from the faculty with an emphasis on current literature supplemented with student presentations of assigned journal papers for class discussions. There will be two student  presentations each Wednesday and faculty lectures with student discussions Mondays and Fridays. The selection of the papers will be both retrospective and prospective – one will cover the prior material and the second will prepare for new material. There will be a final short essay style exam on the last day of classes.
Course Directors: The course will be co-directed by Drs. Craig C. Beeson (beesonc@musc.edu, 843-876-5091) and John J. Lemasters (lemaste@musc.edu, 843-876-2360). Dr. Beeson has a long track-record as a professor in the curriculum for CGS PhD and MS students, and his participation in the current course reflects his knowledge base in mitochondrial physiology and bioanalytical techniques of metabolic studies. He is the director of the Bioenergetic Profiling Core. Dr. Lemasters is a Professor with world-renowned expertise in mitochondrial physiology and pathophysiology. He is also a world leader in cellular imaging with a particular focus on mitochondrial function and is the director of the Molecular Imaging Core. Together with other fellow “mitochondriacs” on campus, Drs. Beeson and Lemasters have elevated MUSC to one of the most highly respected academic institutions in the field of bioenergetics and metabolism.

Evaluation:
Exam: The course will have one closed-book, in class examination. The purpose of this examination will be to determine whether students have learned the fundamental quantitative and qualitative material presented in the class, and will also prompt students to think about how the fundamental principles that they have learned can be applied to current topics of disease and pahology. Course directors will outline the key objectives to students as the class progresses. The examination will be designed to integrate material from different class sessions to minimize compartmentalized learning and maximize "bigger picture" thinking. Questions will be of the short-essay format, and may require students to solve problems, and design experiments or propose models. Students will have the opportunity to complement their written responses with drawn models and figures in an effort to develop their skills in using visual aids to more effectively convey complex concepts.

Participation:
Student participation will also be evaluated, and will reflect attendance, participation in discussions and exercises, and in particular participation in the student presentation sessions.

Grading:
Faculty will evaluate the attendance, preparation, and participation in the overall discussion and any group exercises that occur. The following rubric will be used to evaluate participation:

Criterion

Needs improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Active participation

Does not contribute

Responds to direct queries, sometimes volunteers

Often volunteers, initiates new discussions on topics related to class topic

Relevance of participation to topic under consideration

Contributions are sometimes off-topic or distracting

Contributions are always relevant to discussion

Contributions are relevant and promote in- depth or novel analysis

Evidence of level of preparation

Does not appear to have read the material in advance and/or has little comprehension

Comes prepared to class and can take advantage of opportunities for discussion

Comes prepared and may bring additional material into discussion beyond what was assigned

Listening/ cooperation

Inattentive, doesn’t respect or contribute to team

Participates regularly, responds well and contributes to team

Participates well and shows leadership: promotes active participation by others

The Following Rubric will be used as a guideline for evaluating student exam responses

 ExemplaryCompetentNeeds Improvement
Clarity/OrganizationResponses are well thought out and organized, utilize proper grammar, connections are clear and transitions are smoothResposes are adequate and are reasonably well organized, connections are generally clear and most transitions are smoothReponses are incomplete or use poor grammar an punctuation, are disorganized, Connections are not clear and/or transitions are not smooth
ComprehensionProvide logical responses beyond what is presented in class, integrates literature and class material, and exhibits independent thinkingProvide responses that merely repeat facts with no integration of concepts and/or exhibits minor flaws in logicProvide responses that only repeat class material and/or are fatally flawed in terms of logic

Final grades will reflect overall student participation (40%), and the examination (60%).

The course will utilize the E*value system to obtain student feedback and faculty evaluation.

The proposed syllabus is:

Date

Lectures

Instructor

Wed Jan 4

The Ecology of Bioenergetics Metabolism: Photosynthesis extracts energy from the sun that is stored in nutrients. Bioenergetic metabolism has evolved multiple mechanisms to extract the energy to enable life processes. The discussion will describe how energy is extracted, how the metabolic processes are   integrated, how energy is distributed and the regulatory network.

Beeson

Fri Jan 6

Metabolism of Sugars – a Redox Paradox: The primary sugar used to produce energy in humans is glucose that is oxidized via glycolysis. Glucose is also oxidized via the pentose phosphate pathway to generate reducing equivalents. Both pathways are not redox balanced – the discussion will discuss the pathways and resolve the presumed paradox of the missing reduction reactions that balance sugar metabolism.

Beeson

Mon Jan 9

Student Presentations I: Two journal papers will be discussed, both related to energy extraction and regulation of redox balance – fundamental aspects of life and death.

Beeson

Wed Jan 11

Protons and Electrons in an Ancient Journey in Mitochondria: Electrons in a high-energy state traverse across a series of ancient proteins. Some of the energy is used to pump protons across a membrane and the protons find their way back via a ‘machine’ that creates ATP – the energy currency of the cell.

Lemasters

Fri Jan 13

Nutrients for Hungry Mitochondria: In addition to supporting electron and proton pumping, mitochondria also consume energy for their many other roles in cell physiology and metabolism – their food sources include sugar metabolites, fats, and amino  acids. The processes that generate energy from these nutrients are critical to keeping mitochondria healthy.

Lemasters

Mon Jan 16

The Many Roles of Mitochondria in a Cell’s life: Although the nucleus of a cell is its control center, the mitochondria are the inputs and outputs to effect control. In addition to providing energy, mitochondria are critical stress sensors that receive input from the cytosol and organelles. Integration of the stress signals via nuclear- mitochondrial signaling can determine cell fates such as growth, autophagy, apoptosis or oncosis.

Lemasters

Wed Jan 18

Student Presentations II: Two journal papers will be discussed, both related to energy production, nutrient utilization and cell fate from the perspective of mitochondria.

Lemasters

Fri Jan 20

Regulation of Bioenergetics Metabolism: It was widely assumed that energy production largely regulated via largely a supply versus demand. Recent studies reveal that mitochondria lie at the nexus of well known signaling pathways that converge with cell cycle, intercellular communication, and cell death.

Beeson

Mon Jan 23

Profiling Bioenergetics in Cells, Tissues and Organisms: The ecology of bioenergetics involves the flow of nutrients, redox species, and ions. Static concentration measurements of metabolites are useful, but the time- dependent changes in those concentrations reveal the organism’s health. Measurements of these “fluxes” have revealed the roles of metabolism in homeostasis, pathology and disease.

Beeson

Wed Jan 25

Student Presentations III: Two journal papers will be discussed, both related to methods for measuring bioenergetic profiles and how changes in these can lead to disease.Beeson

Fri Jan 27

Mitochondrial Morphology & Dynamics: The predominant view of mitochondria still largely remains that of a small “sausage” shaped organelles rather than what is now known to be a dynamic, highly regulated cycle between small ‘sausages’, branched networks and even a single reticulated structure. Changes in morphology and the connection between morphology and cellular homeostasis will be discussed.

Beeson

Mon Jan 30

Degenerative Pathologies – Brain, Kidney and Heart: Many pathological states, and even aging, lead to the accumulation of defects in mitochondrial function and  the gradual loss of organ function. The discussion will focus on how gradual loss in the balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy leads to loss of organ function in the brain, kidney and heart.

Beeson

Wed Feb 1

Student Presentations IV: Two journal papers will be discussed, both related to degenerative pathologies with mitochondrial connections.

Beeson

Wed Feb 1
Cancer Cells Bioenergetics - Warburg and Beyond: In the 1930s a German biochemist Otto Warburg demonstrated that cancer cells have a "sweet tooth" - a predilection for using glycolysis as its main source of energy. The discussion will focus on how only recently have we found the molecular basis for Warburg's observation and what it means for cancer.
 
Lemasters
Fri Feb 3Mitochondrial DNA and Dysfunctio in Disease: Mitochondria are unique from other organelles (besides the nucleus) in that they have their own DNA that functions quite differently than nuclear DNA. The interplay between mtDNA and nDNA is key to mitochondrial and cellular health. Many diseases arise from defects in this interplayChan

Mon Feb 6

Student Presentations V:

Two journal papers will be discussed, both related to human mitochondrial diseases.

Chan

Tue Feb 7

Written Exam

All

Faculty
Craig Beeson, PhD, Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences
Sherine Chan, PhD, Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences
John J. Lemasters, MD, PhD, Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences

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Integrated Physiology & Pharmacology of the Cardiovascular System CGS 778

Credit Hours: 2.0
February 13 - March 24
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am - 11:00am

Course Co-Directors:
Donald R. Menick, Ph.D.
Department of Medicine/Cardiology
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 326C
Telephone: 843-876-5045

Jeffrey A. Jones Ph.D.
Department of Surgery/Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm 338C
Telephone: 843-792-0062

Course Justification:  There is currently no 1st year selective covering Physiology and Pharmacology.  It will replace in part Human Physiology CGS 702K which is no longer being taught. We propose that this be one of two courses covering Physiology and Pharmacology which are taught on alternate years.  Each of these courses would focus on a different organ system to teach the principles of Physiology and Pharmacology. The course proposed here will use the Cardiovascular System as an example and introduction to Physiology and Pharmacology. 

Course Description:  The course has 4 thematic focuses of Cardiovascular System:
1) Cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology: neuromuscular transmission and excitation-contraction coupling; 2) Electrical activity of the heart; 3) Cardiac output and its alterations during exercise and failure; and 4) Circulation and vascular hemodynamics.  The class will minimize lectures, didactic discourses, and have no simple regurgitation of “facts”.  The first few minutes of each Theme we will give abroad overview of the subject area tying in the clinical significance.

Course Objectives: Deepen students understanding of integrated physiology with an emphasis on regulation.  To help students identify innovative approaches and questions and help them determine if a hypothesis or experimental approach really matters.  Encourage sound analysis and interpretation of experiments in pre-clinical models. Students will explore how the heart works, what can go wrong, and how we target specific ion channels, G protein coupled receptors, and enzyme systems to manipulate how the heart works and functions.  

Course Outcomes: By the end of the course the student should: 1) have a basic understanding of membrane potential and action potentials; 2) have a basic understanding of channels, pumps and exchangers; 3) have knowledge about neurohumoral control of cardiac function; 4) be able to describe excitation-contraction coupling; 5) have an understanding of SA and AV nodes and pacemaker currents, 6) be able to describe different pharmacological interventions that can be made to improve heart function; 7) be able to describe what generates cardiac fibrosis and its impact on diastolic heart function; 8) understand the basics of cardiac hypertrophy; and 9) be able to describe the progression of atherosclerosis and resulting ischemic injury in the heart.

Course Format:  This 2 hour First Year Selective Course will be given over a period of 5 weeks. Each week will consist of three sessions lasting 2 hours.  The majority of the time will be dedicated to Socratic Discussion around questions and problems posed by faculty and the students themselves. The faculty will give very brief presentation and then work to facilitate discussion among the students to propose ideas, hypothesis etc. The students will be encouraged to rebut and defend their ideas and/or hypothesis. Each week the class will discuss at least one classic and one cutting edge paper.  At the end of each thematic focus there will be discussion by the class lead by both a clinical-scientist and a basic scientist. Again a brief presentation by faculty and then their role is to stimulate class discussion.

“A mediocre person tells. A good person explains. A superior person demonstrates. A great person inspires others to see for themselves."
-Harvey Mackay

Grading and Attendance Policy:  Students will receive a merit grade based on the CGS 0 to 4.0 grading scale.  Grade will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions (20%), lead in presentation and discussion of a paper (30%), final exam (50%).

a) The course co-directors will monitor student attendance through a sign-in sheet. Students are
allowed one unexcused absence.

b) Students must read the assigned papers in advance and are expected to contribute to the class discussion. The course co-directors will monitor the class discussion. Students who do not participate in the class discussion will be given notice that they need to increase their interaction with the group. All students will be required to answer a question given by the instructor on the Journal Article. The answers will be submitted for grading prior to the start of each class.

c) Each registered student is required to lead at least one paper discussion. The selected students will lead a small group discussion in which the group will critique the assigned paper(s), interpret the data, and discuss the implications of the results.

d) The in-class closed book final exam will consist of short essay questions where students will interpret data and propose experimental protocols to test specific hypotheses.

Faculty Roster:

Donald R. Menick, Ph.D.
Department of Medicine/Cardiology
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 326C
Telephone: 843-876-5045

Jeffrey A. Jones, Ph.D.
Department of Surgery/Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 338C
Telephone: 843-792-0062

John Woodward, PhD
Professor, Departments of Neurosciences and Psychiatry
Office:  456 IOPN
Telephone:  843-792-7353

Rupak D. Mukherjee, Ph.D.
Department of Surgery/Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 338G
Telephone: 843-792-1698

Lauren Ball, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Pharmacology
Office:  311
Telephone:  843-792-2475

Sheldon Litwin, MD
Spaulding Paolozzi Endowed Chair
Professor of Medicine
STB-BM200
Telephone:  843-876-4790

David Kurtz, PhD
Professor
Dept. of Pharmacology
Office:  BSB 319F
Telephone:  843-792-5844

Amy Bradshaw, PhD
Associate Professor
Dept. of Medicine, Cardiology
Office:  223 STB
Telephone:  843-792-4959

Mike Zile, MD
Dept. of Medicine, Cardiology
Office:  Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 321
Telephone:  843-792-6866

Thomas E. Brothers, M.D.
Department of Surgery/Division of Vascular Surgery
Office: Thurmond/Gazes, Rm. 654G
Telephone: 843-876-4854

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​2017 Spring Schedule
M/W/F Time: 9-11 Room?  (MCBP/PCOL, 2hr)

Week

Date

Title

Professor

Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology: Neuromuscular Transmission
and Excitation-Contraction Coupling

1

Mon 2/13/17

1. Introduction to how it works and what can go wrong;
2. Membrane potential and action potentials: Channels, pumps and exchangers.

1. Menick,

2. Woodward

Wed 2/15/17

Excitation-contraction coupling

Menick, Mukherjee

Fri 2/17

Pharmacological Interventions: Digitalis, ionotropic agents

Ball

Electrical Activity of the Heart:  The beat goes on.

2

Mon 2/20

SA and AV nodes and Pacemaker currents
Cell-Cell communication, Gap junctions         

Mukherjee

Wed 2/22

ECG
Discussion of Classic or cutting edge paper.

Mukherjee

Fri 2/24Getting the beat right:
Pharmacological interventions, Antiarrhythmic Drugs
Discussion of Classic or cutting edge paper
Litwin

Cardiac output and its alterations during exercise and failure

3

Mon 2/27

Introduction to how it works and what can go wrong;
Neurohumoral control of cardiac function
Adrenergic receptors in the cardiovascular system                  


Kurtz

Wed 3/1

Response to increased physiologic load; exercise
Response to increased pathological load
Action of Angiotensin II

Menick,

Jones

Fri 3/3

Cardiac fibrosis

Bradshaw

4

Mon 3/6

Putting it together and what can go wrong
Discussion of Classic or cutting edge paper

Zile

Circulation and vascular hemodynamics

4

Wed 3/8

Introduction to how it works and what can go wrong;
Arterial pressure control
Neurohumoral control of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium   

Jones

Fri 3/10

Hypertension
Atherosclerosis and response to ischemic injury

Ball

Menick

5

Mon 3/13

Spring Break

 

Wed 3/15

Spring Break

 

Fri 3/17

Spring Break

 

6

Mon 3/20

Peripheral vascular disease
Discussion of Classic or cutting edge paper

Brothers

Wed 3/22

Course-wide Overview
Review of current or classic papers

Kubalak

Fri 3/24

Exam

 

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Human Genetics and Genomics CGS 780

Credit Hours: 2.0
April 3 - May 5
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am - 11:00am

Course Director: 
Julie Woolworth Hirschhorn, Ph.D. 
Phone: 843-792-1181

Instructors:
Stephen P. Ethier 
Gerard T. Hardiman 
Linda E. Keleman 
Paula S. Ramos 
G. Shashidhar Pai 
Dayna Wolff

Description and Objectives:
This course is being developed as one of six mini-courses that will be offered to 1st year PhD students in the Biomedical Sciences in the spring of their 1st year.  These courses are intended to introduce students to contemporary areas of science that are not covered in depth in the Fall foundational curriculum. These courses should also involve discussions and activities that engage the students in active learning; judicious use of the primary literature is also encouraged. Faculty in these courses are chosen for their expertise in the area.

This course can and will also be taken by students in their 2nd year (and beyond) who are interested in the topic of human genetics and genomics. 

This course is intended to cover hereditary and molecular genetics as it applies to humans.
1. Develop an appreciation for the power and limitations of genetics and genomics.
2. Develop skills to address questions in genetic/genomic research and clinical practice.

Course Directors and Faculty:
The course will be directed by Julie Woolworth Hirschhorn, Ph.D. (843-792-1181). Dr. Hirschhorn has a strong track record as a teacher of first-year CGS students; she is a faculty member in the Department of Pathology and now works in the clinical Genetics laboratory. Dr. Wolff directs the clinical laboratory and is a well-trained geneticist; she will also be teaching in the course.  Dr. Linda Kelemen is a genetic epidemiologist in the department of Public health whose work is aimed at identifying early biomarkers for cancer and determining how environmental modifiers influence genetic susceptibility to cancer as well as risk and prognosis. Dr. Ramos, a member of the faculty in the Division of Rheumatology & Immunology, uses genetic epidemiology, statistical genetics, population genetics, and bioinformatic and genetic tools to identify factors that are predisposing to autoimmune disorders. Dr. Hardiman, a faculty member in the Department of Medicine, is also the Director of Bioinformatics for the Center of Genomic Medicine. His interests and expertise lie in functional and comparative genomics and their application to identifying genetic targets in a breadth of diseases. Dr. Ethier, a faculty member in the Department of Pathology, is also the Director of the Center for Genomic Medicine. He is a highly regarded cancer biologist and utilizes a variety of genetic and genomic tools in his cancer research.

Course hours, contact hours, and credit assignment:
The course will meet for 6 hours/week, spread among 3 days, for a 5 week period. The class is scheduled for 9-11 AM on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and will be given an assignment of 2 credit hours.

Syllabus

1

Apr 3

Introduction to Human Genetics and Genomics
Chromosomal abnormalities (trisomies, monosomies, rearrangemetns) and associated phenotypes. Molecular/cytogenetic diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Wolff

2

Apr 5

Mendelian inheritance and Disorders I
Pedigree analysis. Classic monogenic Mendelian disorders (eg., sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis)

Hardiman

3

Apr 7

Mendelian Inheritance and Disorders II
Locus heterogeneity (xeroderma pigmentosum, Fanconi anemia) and bi-allelic inheritance

Ramos

4

Apr 10

Non-classical Inheritance I:
Mitochondrial inheritance and triplet repeat disorder.

Pai

5

Apr 12

Non-classical inheritance II:
Imprinting, X-inactivation and epigenomics

Ramos

* Take home graded exam/problem set

6

Apr 14

Genetic Epidemiology

  • Genetic models of disease; study designs to assess genetic inheritance in genetic diseases: Familial Aggregation, Segregation Analysis, Linkage Analysis
  • ​Introduction to Genetic Association studies (population studies, polygenes)

Kelemen

7

Apr 17

Genetic Association Studies I: Study Design Issues
Candidate gene studies, GWAS, fine mapping: hypothesis-driven vs hypothesis-free testing
SNP selection; linkage disequilibrium; genome-wide projects

Kelemen

8

Apr 19

Genetic Association Studies II: Analysis Issues
Population stratification, inflation factors, genetic models, haplotype analysis, imputation, Mendelian randomization (use of SNP-phenotype associations to infer causality for behavior-phenotype associations)

Kelemen

* Take home graded exam/problem set

9

Apr 21

Population Genetics, Classic and Contemporary

Ramos

10

Apr 24

Genomics I: Prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders, diagnostic panels, exome sequencing, whole genome sequencing.

Wolff/Hirschhorn

11

Apr 26

Genomics II: Sequencing technologies, analysis, bioinformatics and computational approaches

Hardiman/Wilson/Ethier

12

Apr 28

Genomics III: Bioinformatic tools for functional genomics and reproducible research

Hardiman/Ramos

13

May 1

Cancer Genetics
Mendelian inheritance (gain and loss of function), somatic inheritance, highly penetrant and poorly penetrant susceptibility loci, amplicons

Ethier

14

May 3

Approaches to Consideration and Analysis of Genetic Contributions to a Complex Disease – eg., schizophrenia

Ramos and team

15

May 5

EXAM

 

Evaluation:
Exams: 

There will be two take-home problem sets/exams during the course as well as an in-class exam at the end of the course.  The problem sets/take home exams will ensure that the students understand pedigree analyses and the tools used to examine and work with quantitative genetic data.  The exam at the end of the course will be a closed book exam that will cover the cumulative material taught in the class.

The following rubric will be used as a guideline

 

Exemplary

Competent

Needs Improvement

Clarity / Organization

Responses are well thought out and organized, utilize proper grammar, connections are clear and transitions are smooth

Responses are adequate and are reasonably well organized, connections are generally clear and most transitions are smooth

Responses are incomplete or use poor grammar and punctuation, are disorganized, connections are not clear and/or transitions are not smooth

Comprehension

Provide logical responses beyond what is presented in class, integrates literature and class material, and exhibits independent thinking

Provide responses that merely repeat facts with no integration of concepts and/or exhibits minor flaws in logic

Provide responses that only repeat class material and/or are fatally flawed in terms of logic

Accuracy

Responses are accurate, comprehension of the needed calculations is clear, and confounding variables and missing data are identified.

Responses are largely accurate and comprehension of the needed calculations/schema is usually clear.

Responses are sometimes inaccurate and comprehension of the calculations/schema are weak.

Participation:
The students will also be graded on their participation during the class (15% of the final grade).
The following rubric will be used:
 

Criterion

Needs improvement

Competent

Exemplary

Active participation

Does not contribute

Responds to direct queries, sometimes volunteers

Often volunteers, initiates new discussions on topics related to class topic

Relevance of participation to topic under consideration

Contributions are sometimes off-topic or distracting

Contributions are always relevant to discussion

Contributions are relevant and promote in-depth or novel analysis

Evidence of level of preparation

Does not appear to have read the material in advance and/or has little comprehension

Comes prepared to class and can take advantage of opportunities for discussion

Comes prepared and may bring additional material into discussion beyond what was assigned

Listening/ cooperation

Inattentive, doesn’t respect or contribute to team

Participates regularly, responds well and contributes to team

Participates well and shows leadership: promotes active participation by others

Final grades will reflect student participation (15%), the two problem sets/take home exams (12.5 % each for a total of 25%),and the final exam (60%).

The course will utilize the E*value system to obtain student feedback and faculty evaluation. 

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Fundamentals of Cancer Biology CGS 782

Credit Hours: 2.0
February 13 - March 24
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am - 11:00am

Course Director:
Stephen  P. Ethier, Ph.D.
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Office:  BEB 412
Phone: 843.876.2537

Course Justification: Despite the fact that there are currently two separate graduate school tracks in cancer biology at MUSC, one in the MCBP program, and one within the graduate program of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, there is no course that provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of cancer biology. This is problematic because there are several courses currently offered that function as advanced topics courses in Cancer Biology, and the students come to these courses without the fundamental knowledge needed to appreciate the full value of these other courses. Thus, if we are to have graduate tracks in cancer biology, it is essential that the fundamental ground work be put down so students have a thorough grasp of this important subject.

Course Description: This course will begin with a discussion of what cancer looks like, at the gross and histological levels, and a demonstration of the basic aspects of cancer as a latent, and progressive disease that culminates in pathological processes that result in death.  Next, the course will provide an understanding of how research into the causes of cancer has elucidated in molecular detail the biology of this disease.  The lectures in carcinogenesis will also educate the students on the fundamental environmental causes of cancer and how that translates into public health policies that influence cancer mortality. Then, the course will turn to molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis by discussing the discovery and characterization of viral carcinogens, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and how that is connected to genetic susceptibility of cancer. We will then use that understanding of the genetic and genomic causes of cancer to link the action of these genes to the key phenotypes expressed by cancer cells, such as growth factor independence, immortalization, dysregulated cell death, dysregulated cell cycle progression, and discuss how these phenotypes mediate disease. The course will then progress to discussion of host effects of cancer and how the tumor microenvironment influences cancer progression, leading to discussions on invasion and metastasis, the proximate cause of death in the majority of cancer cases. Having laid this fundamental ground work on the basic biology of cancer, the course will end with a discussion of conventional forms of cancer therapy and how they work, or don't work, and then end with lectures on the future of cancer therapy based on genomically targeted drugs and immunotherapy.

Course Objective: The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the basic aspects of Cancer Biology. The goals are to provide students with a basic understanding of the causes of human cancer, an understanding of the mechanisms of
disease progression, and a fundamental knowledge of how cancer patients are treated in the clinic, and why some cancer treatments are successful, while others are not. The objective is to have students fully prepared to take on the more advanced topics courses in Cancer Biology offered at MUSC, and to be more prepared to move into research labs that do cancer research.

Course Outcomes: By the end of this class students will know what cancer looks like, why and how cancer cells behave as they do and how this causes disease that ultimately still has high mortality rates. The students will also gain valuable insight about how cancer is treated and sometimes cured now, and in the future, which is essential for successful application of cancer biology for translational research. The students will have a good handle on the causes, both environmental and genetic, of cancer, how those causal factors change the fundamental biology of cancer cells, how those changes progress over time to result in disease with specific
features, and they should have a solid grasp about how understanding cancer in molecular detail is leading to new treatment strategies.

Grading policy: The course will be merit graded based on the score of one take-home mid­ term exam (45%) and on in-class final exam (45%), with 10% of the grade being based on class participation and preparedness for each lecture, using the College of Graduate Studies Oto 4.0 scale. As this course is designed to be primarily a didactic lecture course, class participation is less important than in other more advanced topics courses, though students will be expected to have completed assigned reading before each class. The reading list is still being prepared.
The mid-term exam will be a take home exam in which students will have one week to write a 5 page paper on the key published papers that underlie some fundamental aspect of cancer biology. The final exam will be an essay type exam, consisting of one major essay, and several short essays that cover the breadth of material covered in class. The Participation and Examination rubrics will be used to assess student's performance and assign grades.

Faculty Roster:

Stephen P. Ethier, Ph.D. Professor
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Tel: 843-876-2537

Carolyn Britten, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology
Tel: 843-792-1414

Alan Diehl, PhD Professor
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Tel: 843-792-1449

Stephen Guest, PhD Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Tel: 843-876-2539

Amanda LaRue, PhD Professor
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Tel: 843-789-6713

Steven Rosenzweig, PhD Professor
Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology
Tel: 843-792-5841

Paula Traktman, PhD Professor
Dean, College of Graduate Studies
Tel: 843-876-2414

John Wrangle, MD Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology
Tel: 843-792-4271

Syllabus


1


Mon


Feb 13

Histopathobiology of neoplasia.
Fundamentals  of neoplastic progression


Lewin/Ethier


2


Wed


Feb 15


Chemical  and  Radiation carcinogenesis


Ethier


3


Fri


Feb 17

Viral Carcinogenesis, oncogenes and molecular  carcinogenesis


Ethier


4


Mon


Feb 20

DNA tumor viruses, tumor suppressor genes, and heritable cancer  syndromes


Ethier


5


Wed


Feb 22

Tumor suppressors II: caretakers, gatekeepers,  genomic  instability in cancer


Traktman



6



Fri



Feb 24

Oncogenes, dysregulated cell signaling and regulation of gene expression: Molecular mechanisms  of neoplastic  transformation



Ethier


7


Mon


Feb 27

Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cell cycle dysregulation


Diehl


8


Wed


Mar 1

Mechanisms of cell death and cancer cell survival


Guest


9


Fri


Mar 3


Cancer Stem cells


Ethier


10


Mon


Mar6

Mechanisms of DNA repair, and genomic instability  in cancer


TBD


11


Wed


Mar8

Tumor microenvironment, angiogenesis and cancer cell metabolism


LaRue


12


Fri


Mar 10


Cancer  invasion and metastasis


RosenzweiQ

SPRING BREAK


13


Mon


Mar20

Cancer therapy: surgery, radiation and chemotherapy


Ethier/Britten


14


Wed


Mar22

Cancer genomics and targeted cancer therapy.  lmmunotherapy


Ethier/Wrangle


15


Fri


Mar24


Final Exam


WranQle

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Immunobiology CGS 784

Credit Hours: 2.0
January 4 - February 7
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am - 11:00am

This mini-course is composed of fifteen sessions over a period of five weeks (M, W, F at 9:00-11:00 am) focused on a specific component of immunobiology. Two sessions are designated as THINK sessions prior to in-class assignmentst and engage the student in immune system experimental design exercises in the form of literature-based lectures from the course.

Course Director:
Chrystal Paulos, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Department of Dermatology
Office: HO612C
Tel: 843-792-3210

General Reading and Resources
Janeway’s Immunobiology, 9th  edition (2016)
by Kenneth Murphy and Casey Weaver
The Ninth Edition has been thoroughly revised bringing the content up-to-date with significant developments in the field, especially on the topic of innate immunity, and improving the presentation of topics across chapters for better continuity. The library has on-line access to 9th Edition Janeway.

On-line Resource:
Dr. Harris Goldstein Immunology Lecture Mini-Course
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
http://www.einstein.yu.edu/video/?SCID=23&ts=conferences#top

Specific Reading
Papers will be posted on Moodle as required.

Grading and attendance policy
Merit graded using the College of Graduate Studies 0 to 4.0 grade scale. The student’s grade will be based on participation in class discussions (20%), role as a small group facilitator (15%), weekly ‘Journal Article Worksheets’ (30%), and the final exam (35%).

a) Students must read the assigned papers in advance and are expected to contribute to the class discussion. The course co-directors will monitor the class discussion. Students who do not participate in the class discussion will be given notice that they need to increase their interaction with the group. All students will be required to complete a ‘Journal Article Worksheet’ for each paper to the course director(s) for grading prior to the start of each small group session. Assessment Tool: Journal Article Worksheet and Class Participation Rubric.

b) For the THINK sessions: Selected students will lead a small group discussion in which the group will critique the assigned paper(s), interpret the data, and discuss the implications of the results. Each registered student is required to participate at least one paper discussion. Assessment Tool: Discussion Facilitator Rubric.

c) The take home test and final exam shall consist of essay questions and experimental design. These series of questions and concept maps are derived from information in the course and reading material. Assessment tool: Written Assignment Rubric.

d) The course director will monitor student attendance through a sign-in sheet. Students are allowed one unexcused absence. An excused absence will be given on a case-by-case basis (for example, presentation at a conference). Students who anticipate they will miss a class must contact the course director(s) before class. Students who have an emergency absence must contact the course director(s) as soon as possible. Assessment Tool: Sign-In Sheet.

Course Objective:
The course aims are to guide the student through the immune system in all its aspects - from basic cellular immunology, first engagement of innate immunity, to the generation of the adaptive immune response and its clinical/disease consequences. The course will encompass topics such as antigen presenting cells, B cell function, complement system, Toll-like receptors, mucosal immunity, T cell tolerance and immunity.

Course outcomes:
By completing this course the students will understand:

  • Differences between innate and adaptive immunity
  • Structure, function and cellular constituents of immune system
  • Immune programing
  • Normal function of immune system
  • Immune system and disease
  • Introduction to key methods in Immunology

Faculty roster:

Chrystal Paulos, PhD
Mark Rubinstein, PhD
Zihai Li, PhD, MD
Bei Liu, MD
Eric Bartee, PhD
Carl Atkinson, PhD

Syllabus

 

Date

Lectures

Instructor

Wed Jan 4th

Introduction to immunology
-
Properties and powers of the immune response
-Anatomy & Physiology of the immune response

       Chrystal Paulos & Zihai LI

Fri Jan 6th

Introduction to Innate immunity
-
Key immune cells in innate and adaptive immunity

Carl Atkinson

Mon Jan 9th

Innate to adaptive immunity (relationships)
-
Inflammation
-Toll-like receptors and other danger sensors
-Immune responses to microbes and infections

Bei Liu

Wed Jan 11th

Complement
-
Ab mediated effector functions and complement

Carl Atkinson

Fri Jan 13th

Antibodies, B cell biology and therapy
-
The germinal center and affinity maturation
-Ab isotypes, their generation and function
-Ab structure and molecular basis for specificity
-B cell development and clinical relevance

Bei Liu

Mon Jan 16th

MLK day

Take home exam due

Wed Jan 18th

THINK session –
in the context of infectious disease

TBD

Fri Jan 20th

Antigen presentation & MHC:TCR interactions
-
Antigen presentation
-MHC and TCR interactions
-Immunological synapse

Eric Bartee

Mon Jan 23rd

T cell recognition, activation & expansion
-
Trafficking
-Ag recognition by T cells
-Co-stimulation and co-inhibition (signal 2)

Chrystal Paulos

Wed Jan 25th

Immunological memory and responses
-
Naïve, stem, central and effector memory
-NK and NKT cells
-Memory to infectious disease and cancer

Chrystal Paulos

Friday Jan 27th

Immune tolerance and autoimmunity
-
B and T cells development with regards to tolerance
-peripheral tolerance
-Tregs, Bregs, MDSCs and beyond

Mark Rubinstein

Mon Jan 30th

THINK session –
in the context of oncolytics

Eric Bartee & Chrystal Paulos

Feb 1st

Modulation of the immune response in cancer
-
Vaccines
-Cellular immunotherapies
-Checkpoint modulators

Mark Rubinstein

Feb 3rd

Cancer Immunity now
-
discuss current literature

Current literature assignment due

Zihai Li or Chrystal Paulos

Feb 6th

Final in-class exam

Chrystal Paulos

 

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