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Letters from MUSC President, Dr. Ray Greenberg:
- July 6, 2011
- Feb. 22, 2011
- Dec. 15, 2010
- Aug. 12, 2010
July 26, 2010
- Apr. 5, 2010
- Feb. 26, 2010
- Sept. 3, 2009
- June 30, 2009 (pdf)
- June 5, 2009
- May 8, 2009 (pdf)
- Mar. 12, 2009
- Feb. 24, 2009
Feb. 17, 2009
- Jan. 20, 2009
- Jan. 12, 2009
- Dec. 12, 2008
Nov. 24, 2008
- Nov. 3, 2008 (pdf)


Frequently Asked Questions (pdf)

Invitation to e-mail the President's Suggestions Box

Budget Impact: How This Affects Me

Employee Resources

Furlough Update and FAQs

Money Management Tips

News Articles on State Budget Cuts

How You Can Help

Support the Employee Furlough Relief Fund

Ways to Cope with Workplace Change

Ways to Cope with Workplace Change

Tips come from the Colorado State Employees Assistance Program (C-SEAP)

  1. Take Charge: Plan in advance how you will respond to the changed workplace environment, or, if you are furloughed or laid off, what steps you will take to manage your job-search, your finances, and your home life. Write your ideas down. Prioritize the most important steps. For example, when will you update your resume, when will you make contacts to further your job hunt, when will you begin looking at other job-hunt resources, such as the classified ads?

    Plan in advance how you will respond to the changed workplace environment, or, if you are furloughed or laid off, what steps you will take to manage your job-search, your finances, and your home life. Write your ideas down. Prioritize the most important steps. For example, when will you update your resume, when will you make contacts to further your job hunt, when will you begin looking at other job-hunt resources, such as the classified ads?

  2. Talk: When change does occur, feelings may be both positive and negative, and often both at the same time. These are normal responses, to be expected. Identify one or two or a few people in whom you can confide about the personal impacts of the changes. However, don’t limit your conversations to people who are feeling enraged or despairing about the situation; try to seek out people who have a sense of hope and some good ideas about managing the situation.

    When change does occur, feelings may be both positive and negative, and often both at the same time. These are normal responses, to be expected. Identify one or two or a few people in whom you can confide about the personal impacts of the changes. However, don’t limit your conversations to people who are feeling enraged or despairing about the situation; try to seek out people who have a sense of hope and some good ideas about managing the situation.

  3. Maintain a Realistic Outlook: Unrealistic expectations can be a tremendous source of stress and unnecessary suffering. Unfortunately, when organizations undergo downsizing, restructuring, or other major change, a whole host of unspoken, and sometimes unrealistic, expectations can arise. Remind yourself that some problems can be solved with direct action, and some require passage of time and ongoing analysis before meaningful steps can be taken.

    Unrealistic expectations can be a tremendous source of stress and unnecessary suffering. Unfortunately, when organizations undergo downsizing, restructuring, or other major change, a whole host of unspoken, and sometimes unrealistic, expectations can arise. Remind yourself that some problems can be solved with direct action, and some require passage of time and ongoing analysis before meaningful steps can be taken.

  4. Improve Lines of Communication: Clear communication is of greatest importance during times of upheaval. Don’t get into rumor-based discussions, and don’t share unsubstantiated information. If you are an information provider, be specific: acknowledge what you know, and equally important, acknowledge what you don’t know. Offer specific target dates for updates, and even if there is no new information, update people at that time.

    Clear communication is of greatest importance during times of upheaval. Don’t get into rumor-based discussions, and don’t share unsubstantiated information. If you are an information provider, be specific: acknowledge what you know, and equally important, acknowledge what you don’t know. Offer specific target dates for updates, and even if there is no new information, update people at that time. 

  5. Use and Grow Your Coping Skills: The body and mind respond to unwanted changes in a number of ways, including the release of stress-related hormones that can disrupt sleep and appetite. You may find yourself irritable, sad, resentful, and feeling disorganized or overwhelmed. The best ways of caring for yourself, so that your energy for coping with the situation can be as great as possible, and your mind at its clearest, include the following:

    The body and mind respond to unwanted changes in a number of ways, including the release of stress-related hormones that can disrupt sleep and appetite. You may find yourself irritable, sad, resentful, and feeling disorganized or overwhelmed. The best ways of caring for yourself, so that your energy for coping with the situation can be as great as possible, and your mind at its clearest, include the following:

a. Exercise, even just a little: If you’re already an exerciser, it’s important to keep it going. While staying within your level of fitness, doing a little more than usual will be beneficial. If you haven’t exercised in a while, or have health conditions, just adding a short daily walk at a gentle pace has proven effects in reducing stress, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and appetite disturbance. If you’re not sure if exercise is appropriate for you, call your doctor’s office and ask.

b. Maintain a schedule. The loss of the routine that is built into a work-schedule is one of the most difficult things about a job layoff. Get up at a predictable time each day, and go to bed at a predictable time. Don’t watch more TV than you used to. For each day, plan the steps you are going to take, and do most important things first.

c. Relax your body: The stress of change can readily turn into aching muscles and headaches if we ignore the body’s needs. Take a few minutes each day to gently stretch and relax your body.

d. Calm Your Mind: One of the common signs of stress is noticing that your mind is filled with a ruckus of competing thoughts, demands and worries, making it hard to think clearly about any one. Take a few minutes each day, at any time of day it can be worked in, to deliberately allow your mind to quiet and slow. Even a very few minutes per day can have cumulative calming effects, allowing you to do the things you have to do with greater focus. This is especially important if you find that you are feeling ‘scattered’, having difficulty deciding what to do first, or feeling stuck by having too many demands simultaneously.

e. Use Additional Resources as Needed: If you notice that you are having sleep difficulties or that your appetite is off for more than a three or four days, call your doctor and ask for additional recommendations. The same is true if you find that you are so worried or upset that you are unable to focus on the ordinary tasks of your life, or on coping with the work situation. If you find yourself thinking that the situation is hopeless, or you feel too low in energy or motivation to cope, reach out for individual support and counseling. Call your doctor or insurance company for a referral.

In Summary:

Taking Action

• Have a plan, structure your time and follow through. If it’s finding a new job, plan time for updating your resume, and do it.

• Contact the unemployment office. Educate yourself on what community resources may be available, such as a food bank or job services.

Taking Care of Self

• Focus on your health by watching what you eat, getting adequate rest and exercise.

• Don’t use of alcohol and drugs to cope.

• Don’t blame yourself. Remember that layoff is not a personal failure. It is a situation caused by circumstances beyond your control.

• Stay positive about yourself. Identify at least one practical and useful thing you have done to address the situation each day.

Provided by the Colorado State Employee Assistance Program; http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/eo/eap/docs/workplacechange.pdf