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Colbert family honors late father at Faculty Convocation

Cindy Abole | aboleca@musc.edu | August 29, 2017

Colbert family honor their late father Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. with an endowed lectureship at MUSC.
Photo by Anne Thompson
The siblings and members of the late Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. family gather with inaugural Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. Endowed Lecturer Dr. Bruce "B.J." Miller and MUSC leadership on Aug. 22 as part of MUSC's Faculty Convocation. Dr. Colbert, who served as MUSC's first vice president for academic affairs from 1969 to 1974, died tragically in a plane crash in Charlotte in 1974.

Monday’s celestial event did not eclipse Tuesday’s Faculty Convocation at MUSC.

Lisa Saladin, PT, Ph.D., executive vice president for Academic Affairs and Provost, greeted a packed audience filled with faculty, staff, students and guests at the Drug Discovery Auditorium to help mark the beginning of the academic year.

Dr. Bruce BJ Miller was the inaugural Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. Endowed Lecturer at the 2017 MUSC Faculty Convocation. 
Palliative and end-of-life care specialist Dr. Bruce "B.J." Miller addressed the audience at the Faculty Convocation. Dr. Miller is the inaugural Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. Endowed Lecturer. 

A highlight for this year was the inaugural Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. Endowed Lectureship named for MUSC’s first vice president for academic affairs who served from 1969 to 1974. Dr. Colbert and two of his sons died tragically in an airplane crash in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1974. The Colbert family was in attendance to help honor their father’s legacy on campus.

“On behalf of all of MUSC’s leadership, we’d like to express our sincere appreciation to all of you for your support of this lectureship in honor of your father,” said Saladin. The family is also in the process of establishing an endowed chair in his name.

“While I never had the priviledge of working with Dr. Colbert, everything I’ve heard about him and everything I’ve learned has truly humbled me,” she continued.  “And as I seek to follow in his footsteps and become half the visionary leader that he was, I was eager to learn about him as an individual.”

Saladin introduced Layton McCurdy, M.D., dean emeritus of the College of Medicine and distinguished university professor. McCurdy was a good friend and colleague of Colbert and was invited to speak about him and his legacy.

“It’s a great pleasure for me to talk about my friend, teacher and hero,” said McCurdy, who recalled being named the chair of psychiatry when Dr. Colbert came to campus in 1969.

McCurdy spoke about how Dr. Colbert oversaw the Medical University during a period of unparalleled growth. He helped lead the university and hospital through the Hospital Strike of 1969. He worked with faculty to strengthen the university’s core missions of education, research and patient care and played a role in the development of AHEC.

Next, Saladin introduced the keynote speaker and inaugural Dr. James W. Colbert Jr. Endowed Lecturer Bruce “B.J.” Miller, M.D., a palliative and end–of–life care physician and assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Following Miller’s lecture was the presentation of the faculty awards.

faculty members were honored at the Aug. 22 Convocation. They included: (front row) Jean Nappi, Kelly Barth, Katherine Morgan, Teresa J. Kelechi, Laura Kasman and Theresa Gonzales; (second row)Bradley Neville, Frederick Tecklenburg, Eric Bartee, Kenneth J. Ruggiero; (third row) Anbesaw Selassie, Jason Haney and James Prisciandaro. Not pictured: Lawrence Chandler and Patricia Coker-Bolt. 
Fifteen faculty members were honored at the Aug. 22 Convocation. They included: (front row) Jean Nappi, Kelly Barth, Katherine Morgan, Teresa J. Kelechi, Laura Kasman and Theresa Gonzales; (second row) Bradley Neville, Frederick Tecklenburg, Eric Bartee, Kenneth J. Ruggiero; (third row) Anbesaw Selassie, Jason Haney and James Prisciandaro. Not pictured: Lawrence Chandler and Patricia Coker-Bolt. 

Faculty Awards
The Medical University of South Carolina honored 15 faculty members at its annual Faculty Convocation Aug. 22 in the Drug Discovery Building auditorium. The awards were presented following the inaugural James W. Colbert Provost Lectureship delivered by B.J. Miller, M.D., assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, a leading authority in the field of hospice care and palliative medicine.

Listed below are honorees in the categories of Developing Scholar, Peggy Schachte Research Mentor, Outstanding Clinician, Population Health and Distinguished Faculty Service. The Teaching Excellence honorees were announced in the June 2 issue of The Catalyst. The awards are sponsored by the Medical University of South Carolina Foundation.

Developing Scholar

  • Eric C. Bartee, Ph.D., assistant professor of microbiology and immunology, for his studies in the treatment of cancer, specifically using the myxoma (MYXV) virus, a rabbit virus harmless to humans, to treat multiple myeloma.
  • James J. Prisciandaro, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, for his studies in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder and alcoholism using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Peggy Schachte Research Mentor

  • Lawrence Judson Chandler, Ph.D., professor of neuroscience, a prolific and highly successful researcher, for his integral role in mentoring his younger colleagues and postdoctoral students to compete for competitive grants.
  • Teresa J. Kelechi, Ph.D., the David and Margaret Clare endowed chair in the College of Nursing, has been instrumental in mentoring researchers in the College of Nursing, where the College’s rank in NIH grants has climbed from 30th place to 17th place.

Outstanding Clinician

  • Kelly S. Barth, D.O., associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, has become a leading authority in pain management, and in the midst of our national opioid epidemic, has developed a highly successful clinical pilot program in collaboration with Gastrointestinal Surgery to improve pain management and quality of life for patients.
  • Theresa Jacqueline Sullivan Gonzales, D.M.D., associate dean of curriculum and strategic communication in the James B. Edwards College of Medicine and director of orofacial pain management, is the only chronic orofacial pain manager at the Medical University of South Carolina, taking in approximately 1,000 patients from across the Southeast who may have to wait as long as four months to see her. Dr. Gonzales enjoys a 97 percent satisfaction rate, with 92 percent willing to refer her to others.
  • Katherine A. Morgan, M.D., professor of surgery, has established an international reputation as one of the best pancreatic surgeons in the nation, if not the world, and has helped MUSC become a national leader in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis, in which this institution has the second most active program in the country.

Population Health

  • Kenneth J. Ruggiero, Ph.D., professor of nursing and psychiatry and co-director of the Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles and director of the Telehealth Resilience and Recovery Program, for advancements in screening trauma patients for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.
  • Anbesaw W. Selassie, Dr.P.H., associate professor of public health sciences, for some of the nation’s most advanced studies in the underlying causes of epilepsy, ranging from genetic and environmental factors to traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries.

 
Distinguished Faculty Service

  • Jean M. Nappi, Pharm.D., professor with dual appointments in the colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, joined the faculty in 1992 and has been involved in all facets of university life, including program director for pharmacotherapy residents. She currently serves as the faculty liaison for the entire pharmacy residency program. Her clinical duties and her involvement in many national organizations have resulted in widespread recognition, including receipt of the Clinical Practice Award and the President’s Award, both from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, and the MUSC Clinical Services Recognition Award multiple times. Dr. Nappi’s academic efforts have resulted in her being named Professor of the Year and Preceptor of the Year at MUSC and receiving the Education Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy in 2006. She also received the Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy in 2012. This is the highest honor for an educator in her field.
  • Bradley W. Neville, D.D.S., Distinguished University Professor in the James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine, is the senior author of the textbook Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, first published in 1995 and now in its fourth edition. Often called “the Neville book,” it is used by 57 of the 66 American dental schools and by foreign dental schools as well. His renown is such that he has presided over the most prestigious North American organizations of his profession: the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and his specialty board, the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Dr. Neville has received numerous honors, including induction into the Omicron Kappa Upsilon National Honorary Dental Society; Fellowship of the Pierre Fauchard Academy; Outstanding Alumnus Award from the West Virginia University School of Dentistry; and this year, the Distinguished Dental Alumnus Award from Emory University.
  • Frederick W. Tecklenburg, M.D., associate professor, former medical director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, could be called the Father of Pediatric Intensive Care, as he was instrumental in its establishment when the Children’s Hospital opened in 1987. For many years he was the only physician on staff to care for children with emergency or critical care needs, sometimes remaining at the bedside for days without leaving the hospital. He was also a driving force behind the establishment of Meducare and served as its first pediatric medical director. He also played a vital role in establishing the Child Abuse Pediatric Division. Dr. Andrew Atz, professor and chairman of pediatrics, says this of Dr. Tecklenburg: “Each hospital has faculty who are the ‘souls’ of the entity. Dr. Tecklenburg is such a person.”

 

 
 
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