David Garr, Dorothy Hogg, Gail Stuart, Mary Swain and Michelle Mollica after
the presentation of the 2018 Alumni Awards.


The Office of Alumni Affairs presented the 2018 College of Nursing Alumni Awards to four individuals whose outstanding professional accomplishments and volunteer services have contributed to the success and reputation of the MUSC College of Nursing.

Maj. Gen. Dorothy A. Hogg | MSN '97 - Distinguished Alumnus/Alumna Award
Awarded to an alumnus/alumna who has distinguished him or herself in the nursing profession, in the community and brought honor to MUSC and the College of Nursing. Eligible nominees are graduates of 11 or more years.

Dr. Michelle Mollica | PhD '14 - Exemplary Recent Graduate Award
Recognizes an alumnus/alumna who has distinguished him or herself professionally in the field of nursing. Nursing alumni who graduated within the last ten years are eligible for this award.

Mrs. Mary Watcher Swain | BSN '80 - Outstanding Service to College of Nursing Award
Given to an individual or organization that demonstrates outstanding service which promotes the advancement of the College of Nursing.

Dr. David Garr - Honorary Alumnus Award
Awarded to an individual who, while not a graduate of the MUSC College of Nursing, has made significant contributions to the college’s educational mission.

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Maj. Gen. Dorothy A. Hogg is the deputy surgeon general and chief of the Air Force Nurse Corps, Office of the Surgeon General, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. She directs operations of the Air Force Medical Service, composed of a $6.1 billion, 44,000 person integrated health care delivery system serving 2.6 million beneficiaries at 76 military treatment facilities worldwide. She oversees the daily functions of the Air Force Surgeon General's office with offices in Washington, DC, Fort Detrick, MD, Falls Church, VA and San Antonio, TX. Included in these functions are clinical operations and quality, aeromedical evacuation, global force management, readiness, strategic medical plans, programs and budget, medical force management and medical information systems management.  General Hogg coordinates Air Force Medical Service operations through major commands, joint service agencies, the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs), the Defense Health Agency and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Additionally, as chief of the Nurse Corps, General Hogg is responsible for recruitment, accession, training and education of 18,000 active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard Airmen. She oversees policy and program development which ensures the highest standards for patient-centered, evidence-based nursing practice for all eligible beneficiaries. General Hogg entered the Air Force in 1984 and has commanded at the squadron and group level and served as the deputy command surgeon for two major commands. She has deployed in support of operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. She earned her Master of Science in nursing degree from the MUSC College of Nursing in 1997. 

 

Michelle Mollica, PhD, MPH, RN is a program director in the Outcomes Research Branch of the Healthcare Delivery Research Program (HDRP). Before joining HDRP, Mollica was a Cancer Prevention Fellow (CPF), working with Dr. Erin Kent. As a CPF, Mollica worked on a number of projects with the SEER-CAHPS linked data resource and the Cancer Care Outcomes Research & Surveillance Consortium (CanCORS) Caregivers Study. She received her PhD in nursing science at the MUSC in 2014. As part of her doctoral work, Mollica created and piloted a peer navigation intervention utilizing long-term African-American breast cancer survivors as peer navigators to increase adherence to follow-up care and overall quality of life. Mollica also spent over 10 years working clinically as a nurse at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City and Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY. In addition, she was an assistant professor of nursing at D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY, teaching at both undergraduate and graduate levels. With an enduring interest in issues related to cancer survivorship, Mollica explores the intersection of survivorship and healthcare delivery, including patient experiences, quality of care, informal cancer caregiving, and follow-up care. Her research interests also include survivorship issues including the transition to post-treatment survivorship, spirituality, and quality of life. Mollica has a background in mixed methods research and community-engaged research and has extensive experience conducting qualitative research and intervention development in underserved populations.

 

Mary Watcher Swain graduated in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. Over the years, her unwavering support has been instrumental in the college's mission. Swain and her husband, David, truly believe nurses are a patient's strongest advocate of care by protecting the health, safety, and rights of their patients. From helping a patient understand his or her diagnosis to assisting with health care treatment plans to navigating the insurance maze, a nurse plays so many different roles that it’s impossible to encompass them all in just one job description. These beliefs led the Swains to establish the college's fifth endowed chair in 2016. The Mary Watcher Swain Endowed Chair in Nursing focuses on promoting quality of life care and improving health. Swain and her family also made a generous gift to the building fund in 2014. The Mary Watcher Swain Foyer provides the college a stunning entrance into the first-class educational facility that serves as an inspirational setting for our nursing students, faculty, and staff. Additionally, Swain led her class to raise money for the naming rights to the Archives Room during the college's recent renovation. Swain is the mother of six children and two grandchildren. After graduation, Swain worked in nursing for several years and then devoted her time to caring for her children and running the vineyard on the family property. Today, Swain volunteers extensively with several organizations in her community. As a resident of Woodruff, SC, she is very involved in her church and runs a summer camp for underprivileged elementary school children each year at the Woodruff Community Center. For the past several years, Swain has served on the Board of Artisphere, an annual fine arts street festival that is held in Greenville the weekend after Mother's Day. Artisphere is now rated seventh in the nation for visual and performing arts street festivals.

 

David R. Garr, MD, is the executive director of the South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (AHEC), a system that works closely with the state's institutions of higher education and other partners to educate, recruit, and retain health care providers. He also has been a practicing family practitioner for more than 46 years. A long-time supporter and colleague of the College of Nursing, Garr is currently involved in two HRSA grants to increase nurse practitioner recruitment and practice in SC's rural and underserved areas. In addition, he is involved with state legislation to support tax credits/deductions for primary care preceptors of medical students, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in South Carolina who attend public colleges/universities. Garr began his medical career in Utah in 1975 as a rural family doctor in a practice that was established as a National Health Service Corps site. Common themes that have served as the underpinning to his career have been improving access to primary care, reducing health disparities, advancing interprofessional education and practice, and studying ways to increase the quality of health care and the provision of preventive services to populations. Garr graduated from Duke University School of Medicine and is board certified in family medicine. He completed a residency at Highland Hospital in West Virginia and is affiliated with MUSC University Hospital and Trident Medical Center.