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Graduate Training

Graduate Program Courses

Courses

FIRST YEAR GRADUATE PROGRAM

Biomedical Sciences (College of Graduate Studies Common First-Year Curriculum) - Elements of this course include: Foundations of Biomedical Sciences; Essentials of Scientific Practice; Three 6-8 week Laboratory Rotations; Seminar Series: Important Unanswered Questions in the Biomedical Sciences; Eight-week Spring Elective; Program Exposures in which students are familiarized with graduate training programs available. 15 hours, Fall and Spring. All faculty.

PCOL 724/PHMSC 712. Drug Discovery and Molecular Pharmacology - This eight week spring elective explores the scientific principles underlying targeted drug design. Medicinal chemistry is integrated with molecular biology in the context of identifying tomorrow’s best-in-class drugs. The interdependence of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic structure-activity relationships will be discussed as a prominent feature of drug discovery. 3 hours, Spring. Ken Patrick with Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacology faculty.

SECOND YEAR GRADUATE PROGRAM

PCOL 721. Principles of Pharmacology - This course develops an understanding of the principles required for conducting research studies involving the use of pharmacological agents as tools for understanding basic biological processes. The course covers basic principles of receptor theory, analysis of dose-response relationships, data interpretation, and the relationship between the chemistry of biological molecules and their cellular actions. These principles are developed in relation to signal transduction /cancer biology, functional genomics, and drug metabolism/toxicology. The course will impart an essential understanding of how pharmacological agents interact with living systems and how such actions are examined from an experimental point of view. 4 hours, Offered every Fall. Lauren Ball, Joe Blumer, Jen Isaacs and faculty.

PCOL 625. Medical Physiology - The course consists of six major blocks: Foundations, Musculoskeletal, and Cardiovascular/Respiratory taught during the fall semester and Kidney/Gastrointestinal, Urogenital/Reproductive, and Cognition/Control taught during the spring semester. The fall semester presents concepts of: 1) cell membrane structure and function including transport processes, receptors/signaling and electrophysiology; 2) muscle types emphasizing excitation and contractile processes; 3) autonomic nervous system organization and function; 4) regulation and maintenance of cardiovascular and respiratory function; 5) laboratory exercises on the electrocardiogram (ECG) and pulmonary function testing. This course is designed to convey basic physiologic concepts towards understanding the integrative nature of organ and whole body function. The course is recommended prior to taking Dental or Medical Pharmacology as it provides a base for understanding the therapeutic and toxic effects elicited by drugs. 4 hours, Fall. Lauren Ball and Ed Soltis. College of Medicine faculty.

PCOL 621G. Dental Pharmacology - Presents important concepts and principles regarding the proper therapeutic application of all major drug categories. Familiarizes the student with the history, source, physical, and chemical properties of drugs; their biochemical, physiological, and toxicological effects; and their mechanisms of absorption, distribution, action, biotransformation, and excretion. Emphasis is placed on mechanisms of drug action. 4 hours, Spring. David Kurtz. Recommended prerequisite: Medical Physiology (PCOL 625) or Dental Physiology.

OTHER COURSES AND ELECTIVES OFFERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY

PCOL 725. Advanced Topics in Cell Signaling - The vast majority of human diseases involve defects in cellular communication and therapeutic intervention often targets molecules involved in cell signaling. This course will dissect signaling cascades and their alterations in disease states addressing cutting edge issues. The course will be offered each Fall with the theme rotating among three broad topics: Cell Signaling in the Cardiovascular System, Cell Signaling in Cancer, Cell Signaling in the Nervous System. Specific diseases under these broader categories will be selected by faculty or students and then each disease will be dissected by one of the course participants (oral/written) to understand how signaling events are affected, how signaling dysfunction contributes to the onset or progression of the disease and how signaling events might be targeted in a therapeutic attack on the disease. The course is intended for advanced graduate and postgraduate students and will be coordinated with the Cell-Signaling Seminar Series (organized through the Department of Pharmacology) held each Fall, thus allowing seminar speakers to participate in the course. 3 hours, Fall. David Kurtz.

PCOL 726. Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics - This course will examine basic principles of mass spectrometry as well as instrumentation and applications with an emphasis on the analysis of biomolecules. In addition, the course will provide detailed coverage of proteomics analysis including techniques, quantitative strategies, applications and bioinformatics analysis approaches. 3 hours, Spring. Lauren Ball.

PCOL 744 Pharmacology Cell Signaling Journal Club - Current and emerging topics in cellular signaling will be presented and discussed in a journal club-style format. Students will present topics related to cellular signaling using faculty-approved articles from peer-reviewed journals, and will be expected to actively participate in the discussion with other students, post-doctoral fellows and faculty members. 1 hour (Pass/Fail), Fall and Spring. Joe B. Blumer.

PCOL 747 /MCBP 725D. Topics in Cancer Research - Two presentation formats will be used for the course. Initially, a faculty member will introduce and direct students in the discussion of selected literature concerning a single topic. Subsequent topics will be presented by individual students in Journal Club style. Each student will have two opportunities to present selected during the course and will be active discussants when other students present. Topics are selected each term but recently included: Chromosomal translocations and cancer; microRNAs and cancer; Alternative splicing / splicing defects in Cancer; Kinase signaling in cancer; Cancer drug discovery; Tumor microenvironment/ stromal support; mRNA stability; Cytokine signaling/innate immune response; Cancer cell invasion; Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes; Cancer stem-like cells in solid tumors; Oxidative Stress and Cancer; Estrogen & RTK signaling in breast cancer; Tumor metabolism / Warburg effect; Metastasis; Angiogenesis. 3 hours, Fall. Steven Rosenzweig and Dennis K Watson. Prerequisite: Completion of First-Year Curriculum.

MDCOR 830/831. Medical Pharmacology - Presents important concepts and principles regarding the proper therapeutic application of all major drug categories. Familiarizes the student with the history, source, physical, and chemical properties of drugs; their biochemical, physiological, and toxicological effects; and their mechanisms of absorption, distribution, action, biotransformation, and excretion. Emphasis is placed on problem solving through a critical evidence-oriented approach. 4 hours, Fall and 9 hours, Spring. College of Medicine with Pharmacology faculty. John Hildebrandt. Recommended prerequisite: Medical Physiology.

Research - Variable hours. All Faculty

Thesis
- Variable hours. All Faculty

Dissertation - Variable hours. All Faculty

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