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Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Psychiatry Grand Rounds Speaker

  

     Kendon J. Conrad, PhD, MSPH

  
SPEAKER BIO

Kendon J. Conrad, Ph.D., received his doctorate in public policy analysis and a post-doctoral master of science degree in public health from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).  Since 1994, he has been Professor in the School of Public Health of UIC where he teaches “Measurement Theory and Practice in Health Services Research.”  Dr. Conrad’s interests are in long-term care, homelessness, mental illness, substance abuse, measurement, and evaluation research methodology.  He has published over sixty papers in peer-reviewed journals and has edited six books. He was PI on grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the VA, and many private foundations. He served on the first study section on health services research chartered by NIAAA. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the VA funded him to develop the International Conference on Objective Measurement (2001). He currently works with Dr. Michael Dennis at Chestnut Health Systems under a grant from SAMHSA. He and Dr. Madelyn Iris were recently awarded grants from the National Institute of Justice to measure elder abuse and from the Retirement Research Foundation for an elder self-neglect assessment system.  He is also PI on the International Conference on Outcomes Measurement funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse to be held in Bethesda, MD in September, 2010.

  
  
  
  
      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to:
       

1) Differentiate typical from atypical risk factors for suicide.
2) Articulate the capability of modern measurement to identify persons with atypical risk by 
    means of an item hierarchy.
3) Clarify why screening with modern measurement techniques offers information that may 
    improve treatment.

       

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