Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Olga Brawman-Mintzer, MD

  

       Olga Brawman-Mintzer, MD

  
SPEAKER BIO

Olga Brawman-Mintzer, MD, is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). She earned her BS and medical degrees at The Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem, Israel. She went on to serve as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at UCLA.  Dr. Brawman-Mintzer completed residency in Psychiatry at the University of Miami School of Medicine and a 2-year Research Fellowship in anxiety disorders at the Department of Psychiatry at MUSC. She was also a visiting scientist at the National Institute of Mental Health, Division of Services and Intervention.  

At the University level, Dr. Brawman-Mintzer served as Medical Director for CNS Research and Business Development for The Clinical Innovation Group/MUSC Foundation for Research Development. She is the Director of the Anxiety Disorders Program. Dr. Brawman-Mintzer has been also a staff physician in the Mental Health Service line in the VA Medical Center since 2001 and served as a member of the Research and Development Committee at the VA until 2008. Her VA research has been continuously funded through HSR&D multicenter grants and investigator-initiated VA research projects.

A Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Dr. Brawman-Mintzer published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. She serves as Principal Investigator and collaborator on federally funded and industry sponsored multidisciplinary projects focusing on biological correlates, the impact and innovative treatments for neuropsychological sequela of medical conditions as well as mood and anxiety disorders.

  
      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant should be able to:
       

1.  Review the definition, prevalence and cost of TBI.
2.  Review the mechanisms underlying TBI that are relevant to posttraumatic cognitive impairments.
3.  Review current and future directions in pharmacotherapy that may facilitate neurobehavioral rehabilitation.

       

« back to May calendar

 
 
 

© 2014  Medical University of South Carolina | Disclaimer