Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Thomas J. Crowley, MD

  

        Thomas J. Crowley, MD

  
SPEAKER BIO

Thomas J. Crowley, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Division of Substance Dependence at the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. His main clinical and research interest is the etiology of early-onset “antisocial drug dependence”, the combination of adolescent conduct disorder and substance dependence.  With numerous colleagues he uses genetic methods and brain imaging to seek the causes of those disorders.  Dr. Crowley is a current member of the Drug Abuse (NIDA).  He was the recipient of a NIDA MERIT Award, as well as numerous NIDA research grants.  He is a former member of National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  He is past president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and of the .  He is co-chair of the Substance Use Disorders Work Group for Preparation of DSM-V (the diagnostic “bible” of psychiatrists), was a member of the comparable Workgroup for Preparation of DSM-IV, and an advisor on the development of DSM-IIIR, all for the American Psychiatric Association.  Dr. Crowley received two Bachelor’s degrees, his M.D, and his psychiatric residency training at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities.  He interned at Charity Hospital, New Orleans.  He holds Board Certification in Psychiatry.  Following two years as Captain, US Air Force Medical Corps, he has been since1968 a faculty member of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine.

  
      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant will be able to:
       

1.  Describe the relative contributions of genes and environment to comorbid conduct disorder and substance dependence in
     adolescence.
2.  Describe structural and functional abnormalities in the brains of adolescents with comorbid conduct disorder and
     substance dependence. 
3.  Discuss how those findings influence course, and should influence management and treatment, of these comorbid
     disorders.

       

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