Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Eva R. Serber, PhD

  

        Eva R. Serber, PhD

  
SPEAKER BIO

Eva R. Serber, Ph.D., received her PhD in clinical psychology with a specialization in health psychology from the University of Florida. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina, in Charleston, and her postdoctoral fellowship at Alpert Medical School. Dr. Serber previously was a staff psychologist at The Miriam and Rhode Island Hospitals and an assistant professor (research) at the Warren Alpert Medical School for Brown University from 2008-2011. She is currently an assistant professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Bio-behavioral Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is also a supervisor for Behavioral Medicine rotation in the Behavioral Medicine Clinic. Dr. Serber has conducted clinical research and provided clinical services to cardiac patients, with a focus on arrhythmias and implantable devices, and in cardiac rehabilitation. Dr. Serber’s interests are in psychosocial and behavioral cardiology, optimizing medical, psychosocial, and behavioral interventions, and enhancing quality of life. Her area of research examines clinical interventions and how they influence cardiac pathophysiology, such as autonomic function in relation to arrhythmias, or progression of coronary heart disease. Dr. Serber’s expertise is nationally recognized with invited presentations and NIH grants. In both her research and clinical patient care, Dr. Serber’s goal is to improve treatment of cardiac patients, thereby improving their quality of life.

  
      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant will be able to:
       

1.  Identify common biopsychosocial issues and problems in the management of patients with cardiac conditions.
2.  Describe how mental health concerns impact overall outcomes in cardiac patients.
3.  Identify treatment approaches for pts to address psychosocial issues and improve outcomes.

       

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