Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

C. Sue Carter, PhD

  

        C. Sue Carter, PhD

  
SPEAKER BIO

Dr. Sue Carter is currently Principal Researcher in Behavioral Neuroscience at the Research Triangle Institute International, Research Triangle Park, NC.  Dr. Carter was Professor of Psychiatry and Co-Director of the Brain Body Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 2001-2012. She formerly held the position of Distinguished University Professor of Biology at the University of Maryland and prior to that was Professor in the Departments of Ecology, Ethology and Evolution and in Psychology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Carter is past president of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, and holds fellow status in that Society and in the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  She has authored over 275 publications, including editorship of 5 books. The most recent of these is Attachment and Bonding; A New Synthesis (MIT Press).  Research from Dr. Carter’s laboratory documented the role of oxytocin and vasopressin in social bond formation.  Her most recent work focuses on the developmental consequences of oxytocin, including perinatal exposure to synthetic oxytocin, and the protective role of this peptide in the regulation of behavioral and autonomic reactivity to stressful experiences.

  
      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant will be able to:
       

1.  Discuss the importance of and behavioral effects of social support and social bonds (often used to define "love").
2.  Discuss recent findings regarding the behavioral and potentially therapeutic consequences of neuropeptides, including oxytocin. 

3.  Explain the putative role of oxytocin and vasopressin in disorders characterized by dysfunctional patterns of social behavior
     (such as autism spectrum and schizophrenia).

       

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