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Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Raymond F. Anton, MD

SPEAKER BIO

Dr. Anton’s research, both translational and applied, focuses on finding better treatments and diagnostic assays for alcohol use disorders. He has also had prior experience with treatment and research in severe affective disorders. Currently, he is an international expert in the fields of medication development for alcohol dependence, measurement of craving and its neurobiological origins, and genetic predictors of medication response. Specifically, Dr. Anton was the lead investigator on the COMBINE study (Anton et al., JAMA 2006); the largest medication clinical trial for alcohol dependence ever conducted. The over-arching theme of his research is that individuals with alcohol use disorders are different in biology and experience, and therefore require treatment tailored to their specific biology and circumstance (i.e., personalized medicine).

He is the Director of the Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs, the Scientific Director of an NIH/NIAAA funded Alcohol Research Center, and the Director of the Clinical Neurobiology Laboratory in the Institute of Psychiatry. Dr. Anton has also published over 270 articles and book chapters and currently holds a Senior Scientist Career Development and Mentoring Award from NIAAA and has active funding for incorporating brain imaging and genetics into clinical alcohol trials. He also helped pioneer the clinical utility of the CDT blood test for the detection and monitoring of heavy alcohol use. In February 2013, he was awarded the Thurmond Wellness Endowed Chair.

      OBJECTIVES                                                                                                                                                               
       At the completion of this session, the participant will be able to:
       1.  Name and define blood and urine tests of alcohol consumption
2.  Explain how brain imaging might be useful in identifying new medications for treatment of alcohol use
     disorders.

3.  Discuss how genetic differences might predict medication efficacy for alcohol use disorder.
       

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