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Child Psychology Track (155215)

This track offers an array of training opportunities for interns who are interested in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families. Opportunities include specialty clinics and more general outpatient settings. Services are delivered in traditional office-based, community-based, and telehealth delivery models. Several rotations (e.g., Stall, DNCAC, COPE, FCSC) provide opportunities to work with children and families who have been exposed to trauma and/or maltreatment, but others provide opportunities to work a wide variety of other youth populations.

 

Community Outreach Program — Esperanza (COPE)

The Community Outreach Program — Esperanza (COPE) is a specialty clinic within the National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center. COPE provides community-based assessment, referral, and treatment services to children who have been victimized by crime (e.g., sexual and physical abuse, domestic violence) or have experienced other traumatic events (such as a natural disaster or a serious accident). Services are provided in the child's community (e.g., home, school). COPE attempts to reach victim populations that have traditionally been underserved by office-based mental health care programs, especially rural populations and racial/ethnic minorities.

Although open to children from all racial/ethnic minority groups, a significant proportion of referrals involve children of Hispanic descent. In addition to direct services, COPE offers consultation and in-service training to local and state service agencies (e.g., Department of Social Services, public health centers, schools) in order to increase community awareness of the special needs children who have been victimized. Interns have the opportunity to be involved in all aspects of COPE services. Clinically, interns are trained in behavioral and cognitive behavioral treatment interventions, with a particular focus on adapting evidence-based interventions for use in community settings. Interns develop expertise in the assessment and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, depression, and disruptive behavior disorders. Finally, interns are encouraged to become involved in ongoing research and/or to participate in related research endeavors.

After completing the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Accurately identify trauma-related symptoms and diagnose trauma-related disorders among child victims of civilian trauma in community-based settings.        
  • Develop evidence-based treatment plans for addressing trauma-related problems among adult and child victims of civilian trauma within community-based settings.
  • Deliver, with fidelity, evidence-based treatments for PTSD and other trauma-related problems (specifically, TF-CBT, Prolonged Exposure, and Cognitive Processing Therapy) within community-based settings.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's electronic medical record.
  • Identify relevant social service systems that serve civilian trauma victims and advise patients effectively about those services.

Location of Rotation

National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center, MUSC

Faculty

 

COPE — Telehealth Outreach Program (TOP)

The Telemental health Outreach Program (TOP) provides telehealth-based assessment and treatment services for children and adolescents who have experienced traumatic events (e.g. sexual abuse, physical abuse, witnessing domestic violence, natural disaster, etc.). Services are provided via HIPPA compliant videoconferencing software in the child’s community, including home, school, and primary care locations. The intern providing telehealth services will be located at the Institute of Psychiatry on the MUSC campus and the child will be located in his/her community location. TOP provides evidence-based trauma-focused therapy for children and adolescents across South Carolina. The program is dedicated to improving access to trauma-focused treatment using telehealth for traditionally underserved populations, especially rural populations and racial/ethnic minorities. Interns function as an integral part of the treatment team and have the opportunity to be involved with all aspects of TOP services. Specifically, interns provide evidence-based, trauma-focused assessment and treatment, including assessment and treatment PTSD and co-occurring disorders such as anxiety disorders, depression, and disruptive behavior disorders.  In addition, interns will be involved in evaluation of services and expansion of services throughout South Carolina. Finally, interns are encouraged to become involved in ongoing telehealth research and program development.

After completing the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Completely provide assessment and psychotherapy via telehealth technology with trauma exposed children and adolescents.
  • Develop evidence-based treatment plans for addressing trauma-related problems among child victims of trauma via telehealth.
  • Develop and implement clinical procedures specific to a telehealth delivery modality (e.g. safety procedures, protocols for working with clinical staff at remote locations).
  • Deliver, with fidelity, evidence-based treatments for PTSD and other trauma-related problems (specifically, TF-CBT) via telehealth.
  • Tailor trauma-focused treatment to a telehealth delivery modality (e.g. utilizing interactive worksheets, PowerPoint games, screen sharing for real-time viewing of the trauma narrative development, etc.)
  • Effectively coordinate with physicians who are providing medication evaluation and management via telehealth.

Location of Rotation

National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina

Faculty

 

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (Peds)

This rotation is housed the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at MUSC, a multidisciplinary service with representative faculty from several related disciplines, including school psychology, clinical psychology, developmental pediatrics, genetics, and pediatric psychiatry. Interns also frequently have the opportunity to consult with faculty from other disciplines on specific cases. Interns on this rotation participate in each of two specialty clinics: the Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic, and the Infant and Toddlers Assessment Clinic. The first two weeks of the rotation include intensive training in interview and specialized assessment techniques.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic

This clinic provides diagnostic evaluations for children suspected of having an autism spectrum disorder. Referred children may range in age from 15 months to 18 years, and may have a wide range of presenting concerns. Interns assigned to this clinic will receive training in the use of state-of-the-art assessment instruments for these disorders, including the ADOS-2.

Infant and Toddlers Assessment Clinic

This clinic provides developmental evaluations for children from birth to age 4 suspected of having developmental delays. This clinic is a multidisciplinary service that is staffed by clinical psychologists and developmental pediatricians. Interns assigned to this clinic will receive training in early child development and in the use of age appropriate assessments tools including the Mullen Scales of Early Learning.

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Reliably use evidence-based assessment methods for the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders, including the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2). 
  • Provide accurate differential diagnoses for children referred for concerns for autism spectrum disorder.
  • Provide evidence-based individualized treatment recommendations for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities.
  • Reliably use the Mullen and other instruments to provide a thorough, accurate developmental assessment for children ages 0 through 4 years.
  • Work effectively as part of a multidisciplinary team to conduct developmental assessment and develop needs-based treatment plan.
  • Provide sensitive, evidence-based feedback to families regarding their children’s development and proposed treatment plan.

Location of Rotation

Medical University of South Carolina

Faculty

 

Head Start Mental Health Consultation & Treatment Program (Head Start)

This rotation provides a multidisciplinary experience working with teachers, young children, and parents involved in the Early Head Start and Head Start programs (EHS and HS) across the Charleston County area. Charleston EHS/HS serves children through 15 classroom-based centers and an EHS home visiting program.The Charleston EHS/HS programs target high-risk, low socioeconomic status children/families, often characterized by developmental, social emotional, and/or behavioral difficulties. The EHS/HS Consult program provides a step-wise level of care — all children and classrooms are initially assessed, and then proceed through the following steps as needed:

  • Teacher partnership and classroom-wide intervention.
  • Child-specific classroom intervention.
  • Parent consultation
  • Provision of, or referral to, child and family therapy.

Interns receive experience working directly with teachers, children, and parents, as well as other providers (e.g., school counselors, school nurse, administrators).

The intern functions as an integral part of the treatment team and is involved in every aspect of the program. Interns will participate in structured classroom observations and evaluations using a multi-dimensional assessment approach; work with classroom teachers to develop and implement classroom-wide interventions; provide parent consultation; determine appropriateness of additional child and family therapy (e.g., parent training, child maltreatment prevention), and provide such services as appropriate.

In addition to direct clinical services, interns will gain an understanding of systemic issues within Head Start and the public school mental health system, collaborate with Head Start staff regarding program development, develop expertise in interdisciplinary management of high-risk children and families, learn about child maltreatment prevention, and develop and collaborate in related clinical research.

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Effectively complete structured classroom evaluations using a multi-dimensional approach.
  • Complete official classroom evaluation reports for each classroom.
  • Accurately identify developmental, social, and behavioral concerns among children ages 1 through 6.
  • Collaborate with education professional in consultation, referral, and provision of services.
  • Deliver child-specific classroom interventions, parent consultation, and child and family therapy (e.g., parent training, child maltreatment prevention).
  • Accurately track child progress through the step-wise care system.
  • Document the delivery of assessment, consultation, and intervention services and child, family, and teacher responses to services appropriately.

Location of Rotation

Community-based Head Start Centers & MUSC

Faculty

 

Outpatient Youth & Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic (YOP)

This rotation provides interns with the opportunity to deliver outpatient, evidence-based mental health services to children, adolescents, and families with a wide range of presenting problems, including depression, disruptive behavior disorders (including ADHD), anxiety and adjustment problems, parent training, and school refusal. The clinic has a high census, and we have some flexibility to match the type of cases assigned to the training needs and interests of the interns, who work alongside social workers, licensed professional counselors, and psychiatrists in providing multidisciplinary case management for their cases. Interns will be trained in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and other evidence-based interventions for youth and their families. The population served includes children and adolescent (ages 4 to 17 years) and their families struggling with a wide variety of mental and behavioral health problems. Some preference is given in the clinic to children with complex problems that include medical complications or have difficult-to-manage presentations.

At the conclusion of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Assess and accurately identify behavioral and mental health problems in youth (ages 4 to 17) and their families
  • Accurately assess treatment progress and symptom reduction using multiple methods (i.e., self-report, parent report, collateral reports).
  • Deliver family-based behavioral and cognitive-behavioral evidence-based treatments (e.g., Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, among others) for youth aged 4 through 17 years, with fidelity.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's electronic medical record.
  • Effectively provide evidence-based treatments to underserved populations, including racial/ethnic minorities and those families at economic disadvantage.
     

Location of Rotation

Institute of Psychiatry, Outpatient Clinic — MUSC

Faculty

 

Pediatric Health Psychology (Peds Health)

This rotation pairs an eating disorders partial hospitalization program (one day per week) with a pediatric psychosocial consultation clinic (one day per week).

The MUSC Friedman Center for Eating Disorders provides intensive outpatient (IOP) services and outpatient therapy for patients 8 to 24 years of age with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and other forms of disordered eating. The program is based primarily on family based treatment (FBT), also known as the Maudsley Approach, the most empirically supported treatment for adolescents with AN. Other evidence-based treatment modalities are employed in group formats, and a multidisciplinary team helps support and monitor patients. Ongoing assessments and team discussions help determine when IOP patients are ready to “step-down” to outpatient treatment, based on clinical judgment and objective criteria. Eligible patients may continue in the program with weekly outpatient FBT or individual cognitive-behavioral therapy, depending on patient age and diagnosis. Interns perform intake evaluations, lead groups (e.g., CBT, DBT, body image, cognitive remediation therapy), provide meal support, and see IOP patients and/or outpatients.  Participation in weekly team meetings is expected. Research activities are available.

In the Psychosocial Consultation Clinic portion of this rotation, interns will be paired with a childhood specialty clinic (e.g., hematology/oncology) and will provide evidence-based behavioral health interventions and consultation to children and families in the context of an interdisciplinary medical team. Common presenting concerns include developmental issues, school concerns, pain management, medication adherence, sleep problems, and behavioral difficulties.

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Conduct comprehensive psychosocial evaluations of children with complex medical conditions.
  • Provide evidence-based, brief, cognitive-behavioral interventions and consultation for common concerns in children with complex medical conditions.
  • Work effectively as a member of an interdisciplinary team to coordinate care.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's electronic medical record.
  • Describe the principles of family-based treatment and other forms of empirically-supported treatments for adolescents and young adults with eating disorders. 
  • Conduct assessments involving semi-structured diagnostic interviews such as the MINI/Kid.
  • Lead groups for adolescents/young adults including CBT, DBT, and cognitive remediation therapy.                                                                                                                                                                

Locations of Rotation

Cannon Park Place, Suite 220 MUSC/Pediatrics — MUH

Faculty

 

Pediatric Primary Care (PPC)

Interns function as part of an integrated behavioral and physical health team that serves children who are currently in foster care placements in Charleston and Dorchester Counties. Interns perform a variety of duties, including consultation with pediatricians on behavioral health issues; brief, targeted psychological assessments; provision of evidence-based interventions (e.g., Trauma Focused-Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy); and short-term crisis stabilization counseling (using the Child-Family Traumatic Stress Intervention) with foster children and their families. Interns participate in case staffings with the FCSC team (pediatrician, nurse-practitioner, social worker, and psychologist), which will jointly determine the service plan for each child. Interns round with pediatricians and nurse practitioners to provide some brief interventions “on-the-fly” during clinic and also have scheduled clinics in which they provide more traditional outpatient psychotherapy (based on referrals and case needs from the FCSC team).

The rotation also provides an excellent opportunity to develop skills for effective interaction with community and public agencies, like the child protection and foster care service systems.

At the end of the rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Effectively screen for disruptive behavior problems, parenting concerns, and trauma-related symptoms in underserved, trauma-exposed youth living in out-of-home care.
  • Deliver, with fidelity, evidence-based and best practice interventions to facilitate improvements in behavioral adjustment, depression, and PTSD symptoms.
  • Interact and consult effectively with a multidisciplinary (pediatrician, nurse practitioner, social worker) treatment team within a primary care setting.
  • Educate multidisciplinary health care providers about behavioral health factors that affect health care delivery.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's MUSC electronic medical record.

Location of Rotation

Medical University of South Carolina

Faculty

 

Stall High School Mental Health Clinic (Stall)

This rotation is school-based and offers broad clinical opportunities working with adolescents with internalizing and externalizing problems, trauma symptoms, and emotional regulation difficulties. Services are provided during school hours; however, interns are encouraged to meet with students’ parents as necessary before or after school. Interns on this rotation will have the opportunity to work with traditionally underserved populations, as Stall High School serves largely African American and Hispanic communities. Clinically, interns are trained in behavioral and cognitive behavioral treatment interventions, with a particular focus on adapting evidence-based interventions for use in school settings. Opportunities for group therapy are available and highly encouraged. Interns work directly with teachers and other school officials to develop treatment plans that are applicable to the classroom setting and that will address school behavior. In addition, interns are welcome to become involved in ongoing research and/or to participate in related research endeavors.

After completing the Stall High School rotation, interns will be able to:

  • Assess internalizing, externalizing, and trauma symptoms utilizing evidence-based, standardized assessment measures, in a culturally competent manner.
  • Develop evidence-based treatment plans utilizing assessment results.
  • Deliver, with fidelity, and monitor the effectiveness of evidence-based treatments for PTSD, anxiety, depression, and/or disruptive behavior.
  • Document the delivery of services and patient response to services appropriately in each patient's electronic medical record.
  • Function effectively in the school setting by providing consultation and in-service training/psychoeducation to teachers and school personnel as necessary.
  • Tailor evidence-based treatment interventions to meet the needs of each student utilizing a culturally-competent and linguistically-appropriate approach.

Location of Rotation

Stall High School, North Charleston, South Carolina

Faculty

Helpful Links

Charleston Consortium Brochure 2017-2018 (PDF)

American Psychological Association
Office of Program Consultation & Accreditation
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
202-336-5979
202-336-5978 (fax)
APA website
apaaccred@apa.org

APPIC Central Office
17225 El Camino Real
Onyx One - Suite #170
Houston, TX 77058-2748
832-284-4080
832-284-4079 (fax)
appic@appic.org

 

 

 
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