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Training > Past Postdoctoral Fellows at the NCVC

Past Postdoctoral Fellows at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center

  • Dr. Zachary Adams (2012-2014) Dr. Zachary Adams earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kentucky and completed his pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina.  His research interests center on the development of impulsive behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults, particularly among people who have experienced traumatic stress.  His current work focuses on how certain individual characteristics (personality, emotions, physiology) interact with traumatic experiences (maltreatment, assault, disaster) to influence risk for behavioral and emotional problems in young people.  He is also interested in studying the effects of secondary prevention efforts to reduce violence and substance use among trauma-exposed youth, as well as models for improving access and delivery of these services among high-risk populations.  At the NCVC, Dr. Adams conducts research in these areas and provides treatment to trauma-exposed children, adolescents, and adults.
  • Dr. Melissa Milanak (2012-2014)  Dr. Melissa Milanak earned her Ph.D. in Clinical and Community Psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests include emotional processing among individuals with trauma exposure, the examination of PTSD qualifying criterion A events, sequelae of trauma, and PTSD symptom structure. She is also interested in facial affect recognition as a measure of emotional processing and sleep disturbances associated with PTSD.  At the NCVC, Dr. Milanak conducts research in relation to these topics of interest, and provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to potentially traumatic events. She is also active in the community volunteering time to help support crime victims and trauma survivors.

  • Dr. Matt Price (2011-2013) Dr. Matt Price earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Georgia State University and completed his pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. His research focuses on enhancing the efficacy and effectiveness of exposure based therapies for anxiety disorders and victims of trauma. Consistent with this focus, Dr. Price is actively involved in research to identify processes and predictors of treatment response, enhance and develop novel treatment practices, and disseminate evidence based practices to providers. A significant secondary component to Dr. Price’s work involves the integration of technology into psychotherapy as a means to improve outcomes. At the NCVC, Dr. Price provides trauma-focused treatment to adults who present with psychological difficulty after exposure to trauma.

  • Dr. Kathryn Reid-Quiñones (2011-2013) Dr. Kathryn Reid-Quiñones earned her M.S. and Ph.D in Clinical Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University with a minor specialization in Developmental Psychology.  She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina where she focused on the assessment and treatment of child trauma victims. She is currently completing her first year of a National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH)-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at MUSC.  Her research interests include individual, family, and environmental factors that influence youth risk and resilience, with an emphasis on coping with trauma.  Specifically, Dr. Reid-Quiñones’ research has concentrated on identifying factors that predict youth adjustment following trauma exposure.  In addition to her interest in risk and protective factors for youth who have experienced trauma, she wants to learn more about the cultural factors that may affect diagnosis and treatment of minority populations.  At the NCVC, Dr. Reid-Quiñones provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who present with psychological difficulty after exposure to trauma.

  • Dr. Andrea M. Jones (2012-2013) Dr. Andrea M. Jones earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She currently is completing her first year of NIMH-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests include the investigation of high risk sexual behaviors and delinquency in relation to sexual abuse in adolescents and young adults. She also is interested in health care disparities as it relates to access to trauma-focused treatment and cultural factors influencing psychopathology after trauma exposure. At the NCVC, Dr. Jones conducts research in relation to these topics of interest, and provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Dr. Simone C. Barr  (2010-2012) Dr. Simone Barr earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical/Community Psychology from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina.  Dr. Barr received a two-year diversity supplement to Dr. Heidi Resnick’s Prevention of Postrape Drug Abuse:  Replication Study grant through the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).  Her research interests include investigating health disparities in access to mental health services for trauma victims.  Specifically, she is exploring the impact that perceived discrimination has on help-seeking behaviors in trauma survivors of color.  In addition, she is involved in the development and implementation of culturally-specific HIV interventions for African American adolescents.   At the NCVC, Dr. Barr provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Dr. Tatiana Davidson (2010-2012)  Dr. Tatiana Davidson earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is beginning her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Davidson received a two-year diversity supplement to Dr. Kenneth Ruggiero’s Web-based Intervention for Disaster-Affected Youth and Families grant through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). She will be involved in the adaptation of the web-based intervention so that it is culturally relevant to Hispanic adolescents and parent disaster victims, and will qualitatively evaluate the potential impact of the web-based intervention with
    Hispanic adolescents and families. Her overall research and clinical interests include Hispanic child and adolescent mental health, and understanding the effects of culture in a variety of contexts, including the development of psychopathology and the evaluation of culturally sensitive prevention and treatment interventions.
  • Dr. Julia Felton (2011-2012) Dr. Julia Felton earned her M.S. And Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Vanderbilt University with a minor specialization in quantitative psychology. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) where she focused on assessment and treatment of child trauma victims. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at MUSC. Her research interests include the dissemination and implementation of evidence based treatments for the prevention of child abuse and the treatment of childhood trauma. At the NCVC Dr. Felton provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Dr. Lisa Paul (2010-2012) Dr. Lisa Paul earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Wyoming while working with Dr. Matt Gray. She completed her pre-doctoral internship through the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Training Program, working atboth the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) and the Ralph H. Johnson Memorial Veterans Affairs Medical Center. She is currently completing her first year of a National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH)-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the NCVC. Dr. Paul’s research interests include social reactions to trauma and the disclosure of traumatic events from the perspectives of the survivor, as well as those around him or her. She is also involved in the development and piloting of a web based intervention for survivors of natural disasters and a virtual reality paradigm for assessing and treating social anxiety. Dr. Paul also provides empirically-supported trauma-focused therapy for children, adolescents and adults through the NCVC.
  • Dr. Kate Walsh  (2011-2012) Dr. Kate Walsh earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and she completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She currently is completing her first year of NIMH-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests involve the examination of risk factors for and outcomes of sexual assault and revictimization. She is specifically interested in the role that emotion dysregulation and related psychopathology (e.g., PTSD) and maladaptive behaviors (substance abuse, high risk sexual behavior) play in risk for sexual assault. She also has interests in better understanding sequelae associated with sexual assault and revictimization and plans to use her research findings to inform the development of more effective prevention and intervention programs for survivors of sexual abuse and assault. In addition to conducting research on these topics at the NCVC, Dr. Walsh provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Dr. Angela Moreland Begle (2009-2010) Dr. Begle earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests include investigation of high risk behaviors, such as substance use and delinquent behaviors, in relation to different types of trauma exposure in adolescents. She is also interested in prevention of trauma exposure in young children. At the NCVC, Dr. Begle conducts research in relation to these topics of interest, and provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Dr. Kristyn Zajac (2009-2010) Dr. Zajac earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Delaware and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests include the role of maternal support in children’s reactions to sexual abuse and prevention of childhood sexual abuse. At the NCVC, Dr. Zajac provides trauma-focused treatment to children, adolescents, and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Alesia Hawkins (2007-2009) Dr. Hawkins earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Northern Illinois University, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical College of Georgia/Veterans Affairs Medical Center Consortium. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her research interests include investigating the effects of family violence, community violence and other trauma experiences on the psychological functioning of youth. She is involved in developing culturally-informed evidence-based interventions to meet the needs of underserved populations. At the NCVC, Dr. Hawkins provides trauma-focused treatment to children and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Genelle Sawyer (2007-2009) Genelle Sawyer received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Nebraska and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. She is currently completing the first year of an NIMH post-doctoral research fellowship at the NCVC. Her research focuses on child maltreatment and its impact on and relation to family processes and interactions, particularly with victims of child sexual abuse. Dr. Sawyer?s other interests include mental health assessment and treatment of trauma victims and their family members. Dr. Sawyer also provides trauma-focused treatment to adults, children and families at the NCVC.
  • Martha Strachan (2007-2009)
  • Alexandra Macdonald (2008-2009) Dr. Macdonald earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Boston University, and completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Medical University of South Carolina Consortium. She is currently completing her first year of Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center (NCVC) at the Medical University of South Carolina. Her professional interests include (a) investigating factors that influence multiple pathways following potentially traumatic experiences, (b) deepening understanding of the ways in which interventions facilitate change in PTSD and related symptomatology, and (c) creating effective methods for dissemination of empirically supported treatments. At the NCVC, Dr. Macdonald provides trauma-focused treatment to children and adults who have been exposed to violence.
  • Monica Fitzgerald (2005-2007) Monica Fitzgerald received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Georgia and is currently completing a second year of an NIMH post-doctoral research fellowship at the NCVC. Her research focuses on the impact of family violence and stress on children's emotional development and psychological adjustment, with an emphasis on parent-child interaction patterns. In particular, she is interested in examining the development and socialization of emotion management skills in families and evaluating these skills as potential underlying processes involved in the relation between family violence and outcomes for children. Dr. Fitzgerald is actively involved in the SAMHSA-funded National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) projects conducted at the NCVC, which examine the best ways to transport evidence-based treatments into community-based settings. Dr. Fitzgerald also provides trauma-focused treatment to adults, children and families at the NCVC.
  • Michael McCart (2006-2007)Dr. McCart graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from Marquette University, earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and completed his pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. His past and current research efforts focus on the longitudinal functioning and interdisciplinary care of underserved youth and families exposed to interpersonal and community violence. Dr. McCart’s other interests center on examining child, family, and therapeutic process factors that influence treatment outcome, and exploring strategies for overcoming the barriers that low-income families typically face to treatment utilization.
  • Regana Contini, M.D. (2006-2007) Dr. Contini earned her BA in Foreign Languages and Literature from University of Milano, Italy in 1976. She then attended the graduate program in community psychology at Boston State College, where she earned her MEd in 1981. From 1978 to 1985 she was involved in the psychoanalytic training at the Boston Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies. After more than 15 years of clinical work for Charleston Mental Health, she went back to medical school and received her MD from University of Padova, Italy in 2006. Dr. Contini currently is an NIMH Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina. Her clinical research interests include the study of environmental, social, genetic and hormonal factors affecting victimization, post traumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse in women.
  • Jennifer Cercone, Ph.D. (2004-2006) Dr. Cercone graduated with Distinction from the University of Virginia in 1996, with a major in Psychology, a minor in Women’s Studies, and a burgeoning interest in violence against women. After a 3-year stint as an employee on the Neurobehavioral Unit at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, MD, where she received training in applied behavior analysis, she entered the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at the University of Georgia. She subsequently earned her M.S. in 2002 and her Ph.D. in 2004. She completed a pre-doctoral internship, including specialized training in Psychology of Women, at the Medical College of Georgia and Veterans Affairs Medical Center Psychology Residency Consortium in Augusta, GA. As a graduate student, her research focused on aspects of gender symmetry and asymmetry in intimate partner violence. More specifically, while emphasizing that women suffer greater physical and psychological injury as a result of victimization, this work also addressed women’s use of violence so that it could be appropriately contextualized. As a postdoctoral fellow, she continued to investigate the gendered nature of IPV. In addition, she has developed an interest in research that takes into account the complexity of cumulative exposure to interpersonal violence and the associated comorbid outcomes.
  • Shannon Self-Brown, Ph.D. (2004 - 2006) Dr. Self-Brown completed her undergraduate coursework at University of West Florida, receiving her Bachelor's in Psychology in 1995 and graduated Magna Cum Laude. This was followed by her Master's degrees in Psychology in 1997, also at the University of West Florida, after which Dr. Self-Brown worked at the University of California, San Diego, as a research coordinator for an NIH multi-site grant. In 2004, Dr. Self-Brown earned her Ph.D. in Child Clinical Psychology from Louisiana State University. During graduate training, Dr. Self-Brown specialized in clinical and research work with underprivileged youth exhibiting behavioral, psychological, and academic problems. She completed a Pre-Doctoral Internship in Clinical Psychology at the University of Miami Medical Center where she served as part of the Miaimi Child Protection Team and conducted forensic evaluations and psychological treatment for abused and neglected youth. As a fellow at the NCVC, Dr. Self-Brown provided trauma-focused therapy to children and adults who are exposed to, or are victims of, violence. Her research interests include the effects of community and family violence on the psychological functioning of youth, the effects of forensic medical examinations on sexually abused children, and the importance of family environment in the recovery of children exposed to violence.
  • Carla Kmett Danielson, Ph.D. (2003 - 2005):  Dr. Danielson completed her undergraduate coursework in 1997 at Ohio University, graduating Summa Cum Laude and with Departmental Honors in Psychology. She earned her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Dayton in 1999 and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Case Western Reserve University in 2003. She completed a pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program. Prior to training at the NCVC, Dr. Danielson's primary clinical interests and research program focused on the classification, assessment, and treatment of child and adolescent mood disorders. As a fellow at the NCVC, she intergrated her previous investigations with her current research and clinical interests, which include the assessment, early internvention, and prevention of mood disorders and substance use in adolescent sexual assault victims. She also is involved in research investigating the role of cultural factors in the assessment and treatment of Hispanic trauma victims.
  • Steven Lawyer, Ph.D. (2002 - 2004): Dr. Lawyer earned his B.A. in Psychology from Western Michigan University in 1995. He attended graduate school at Auburn University, where he earned his M.S. and, in 2002, his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. He completed his pre-doctoral internship training at the University of Mississippi, Jackson VA Medical Center Residencey Training Consortium. Dr. Lawyer is a long-standing member of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy and has presented his research at numerous national and international conventions. His research interests include the experimental study of environmental, behavioral, and visceral factors that affect sexual decision-making, the impact of drug-facilitated rape on mental health functioning, and the conceptualization, assessment, and treatment of trauma- and anxiety-related disorders.
  • Angela Waldrop, Ph.D. (2002 - 2004): Dr. Waldrop graduated with a B.A. in Psychology and Sociology from the University of Richmond, earned her M.A. in Psychology from Wake Forest University, and earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. She completed her pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium of the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Waldrop is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, and the American Psychological Association. Her research interests include outcomes and coping related to traumatic experiences, including anxiety disorders, depression, substance use problems, and HIV risk.
  • Kenneth J. Ruggiero, Ph.D. (2001 - 2003): Dr. Ruggiero graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from the State University of New York at Buffalo, earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University, and completed his pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. His prior and ongoing research efforts examine exposure to violence and other potentially traumatic events in relation to fear, distress, and externalizing behavior. Other interests also center on examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and processes and mechanisms associated with change in psychosocial interventions for victimization-related emotional and behavioral problems.
  • Alyssa A. Rheingold, Ph.D. (2001 - 2003): Dr. Rheingold completed her undergraduate coursework in 1996 at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating Cum Laude and with Honors in Psychology. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from MCP Hahnemann University. Dr. Rheingold completed a pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the Charleston Consortium Psychology Internship Program. Dr. Rheingold is a member of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy and the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology (a section within the Clinical Psychology division of the American Psychological Association), as well as other national psychological organizations. Her main research and clinical interests include those that relate to etiological factors and treatment outcome research of anxiety disorders.

Adrienne E. Fricker, Ph.D. (2000 - 2002)

Amy Combs-Lane, Ph.D. (2000  - 2001)

Joanne Davis, Ph.D. (1999 - 2001)

Jeffrey A. Bernat, Ph.D. (1999 - 2000)

Amy Naugle, Ph.D. (1999 - 2000)

Ernestine Briggs, Ph.D. (1998 - 2000)

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